Author Archive for Xanthe Coward

16
Sep
17

I Just Came To Say Goodbye

 

I Just Came to Say Goodbye

The Good Room

Theatre Republic – The Block

September 13 – 23 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

EVERYTHING IS NOT OKAY.

 

Strangely, forgiveness never arises from the part of us that was actually wounded. The wounded self may be the part of us incapable of forgetting, and perhaps, not actually meant to forget, as if, like the foundational dynamics of the physiological immune system our psychological defences must remember and organize against any future attacks — after all, the identity of the one who must forgive is actually founded on the very fact of having been wounded.

 

Stranger still, it is that wounded, branded, un-forgetting part of us that eventually makes forgiveness an act of compassion rather than one of simple forgetting. To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt…

 

David Whyte

 

In 2002 a DHL cargo plane and a Russian passenger jet collided in Swiss-controlled airspace over southern Germany, killing 68 Russian school students, two pilots and Mr Vitaly Kaloyev’s wife and two children. This story is told plainly and simply, chillingly, in tiny pieces, using surprisingly little text. Intricately interwoven along the way are numbered anonymous apologies and offers of forgiveness (or refusals to forgive or to be forgiven) selected from hundreds of online contributions to The Good Room’s website for their newly devised show, I Just Came to Say Goodbye. All the elements come together perfectly, which is no surprise to those who know The Good Room’s previous productions. We know the formula works; we adored I Want to Know What Love Is, which premiered during Brisbane Festival 2014 and enjoyed a return season at Brisbane Powerhouse in 2015, and I Should Have Drunk More Champagne at Metro Arts in 2013.

 

The Good Room has never let the vampires get in the way of making an original show.

 

Directed by Daniel Evans and co-created with Amy Ingram, Caroline Dunphy, Lauren Clelland and Kieran Swann, this is the work that’s consistently disrupting Queensland’s arts’ ecology, demanding more from artists and audiences, and offering a richer, more complex, lingering and affecting theatrical experience.

 

I would like to have the time to sit in on the company’s creative process and tell you more about it because not enough theatre is being dreamed onto our stages in this way, and not enough of our theatre makers believe they can do likewise. This is largely because our training and our theatrical tradition is still so text-based. (We could argue that The Good Room’s trilogy of shows is text-based, but that would be over-simplifying the work and under-valuing the creative process).

 

 

The company’s next work (I’ve Been Meaning to Ask You) will involve young people in its creative development and performance. For some, it may be their first foray into devising from scratch. (Can we note, it’s simply not soon enough to be exploring the work of companies such as Gob Squad, Frantic Assembly and Complicite at a Masters level!). I hope The Good Room’s process becomes a preferred model of devising theatre with students especially, so we might see the process included in the curriculum for Years 10 – 12. Sure, something like it, within “physical theatre” vaguely happens now, depending on the awesomeness of the teachers involved and the cooperation of admin, however; even with an abundance of new work, we’re still seeing chasms in this country between theatre, physical theatre and dance. (Within an intelligently programmed arts festival the gap is less apparent).

 

The truth is, rarely can a response make something better — what makes something better is connection.

– Brené Brown

 

Despite closing with a burst of silver glitter and opening with an eighties’ daggy dance team dressed in Brisbane Festival hot pink (choreographed by Nerida Matthaei, hysterical!), I Just Came to Say Goodbye is necessarily dark. It delves into a place we don’t like to go, exploring the vulnerability that lies at the heart of our anger and our resistance to forgiveness. Can we ever really forgive another? Can we ever forget the things another has said or done to make us feel such anger/betrayal/bitterness in the first place? What happens when we choose not to forgive? In the case of Mr Kaloyev and – spoiler alert – the family and friends of his victim, there’s no happy ending.

 

 

To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt.

 

The inability to forgive seems more often than not to lead to violence, a person lashing out against another, staged literally by The Good Room in an impressive extended fight sequence. Choreographed by Justin Palazzo-Orr it must be the longest continuous fight sequence we’ve seen on a Brisbane stage. It’s violent and tender and funny and tragic. Caroline Dunphy’s movement is always captivating but this performance is next level neo-butoh. She’s a wicked nymph, leaping and climbing and crawling all over Thomas Larkin (who has his own stunning image making moments at the beginning of the show), and hanging from him to create a disturbing, broken picture, to be read as a moment of grief, or the resolve of a ghost, or simply, and complicatedly, a reference to some degree of Stockholm Syndrome in the relationship. (Are there degrees of Stockholm Syndrome?). Or it’s something else entirely, depending, I suppose, on what sort of day/week/month/year/life you’ve had. The intimate moment that precedes this suffering though, is unmistakably a representation of the couple’s abject despair, beautifully, tenderly realised. This sort of intimate connection between performers takes time to develop and direct, and skill to replicate, or discover again, each and every night of the season. It’s so desperately sad. Meanwhile, Amy Ingram is a wildcat, and Michael Tuahine is both fierce and funny in attacking and being attacked. Satisfyingly, everyone ends up fighting everyone; it’s horrifying and highly entertaining. There’s certainly a little schadenfreude at work here.

 

 

Anger truly felt at its center is the essential living flame of being fully alive and fully here; it is a quality to be followed to its source, to be prized, to be tended, and an invitation to finding a way to bring that source fully into the world through making the mind clearer and more generous, the heart more compassionate and the body larger and strong enough to hold it. What we call anger on the surface only serves to define its true underlying quality by being a complete but absolute mirror-opposite of its true internal essence.

– David Whyte

 

Jason Glenwright’s apocalyptic lighting comprises search lights and pin spots and a whole lot of blackness. At times, through the haze, we barely see faces but the voices and the silences between the words convey anything we think we might have missed with our eyes. And played in traverse with the audience seated on two opposite sides, we may well miss something from time to time. Just as in life, this is okay; we see what we want to see precisely the way we want to see it. At the other end of the technical spectrum and across the Theatre Republic at La Boite are the bright lights of Laser Beak Man, also designed by Glenwright. The guy is versatile to say the least! Underscored by Dane Alexander, I Just Came to Say Goodbye wouldn’t work nearly as well without its lights to pierce the darkness and a soundscape to scrape our souls (it’s absolutely terrifying, jarring; try not to be affected).

 

FORGIVENESS is a heartache and difficult to achieve because strangely, it not only refuses to eliminate the original wound, but actually draws us closer to its source. To approach forgiveness is to close in on the nature of the hurt itself, the only remedy being, as we approach its raw center, to reimagine our relation to it.

– David Whyte

 

I Just Came to Say Goodbye is a stunning result from what would seem a simple process on paper, but actually, in anyone else’s hands could be a colossal disaster. What Daniel Evans and Amy Ingram appear to do is to throw everything onto the floor – a vast collection of ideas and feelings and responses to real events and crowdsourced verbatim material – pour fuel over it, and set it on fire to create a spectacular event and food for thought, for a life outside the theatre that demands our burning presence.

 

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15
Sep
17

Trigger Warning

 

Trigger Warning

Zoe Coombs Marr & Token Events

Theatre Republic – La Boite Studio

September 12 – 15 2017

 

Reviewed by Heather Blacklock

 

 

Zoe Coombs Marr brought Trigger Warning to the La Boite Studio for four shows only. Outside, in the precinct, an incredible space called Theatre Republic has been re-built for Brisbane Festival. There’s live music, scrappy bars, food stalls and seating to spare before you go in to see your show. I felt like I was in a giant treehouse.

 


I deliberately went into this show with very little information about what I was going to see. All I had picked up was that Zoë performs as the satirical character Dave. A fact I forgot to tell the friend accompanying me. My poor, darling friend spent the first 10 minutes or so wondering how the hell she was going to break it to me that this person was awful! So firstly, a warning (not a trigger warning) that Dave is going to challenge you in the best way.


The atmosphere flips between uncomfortably tense and explosively uncontrolled guffaws. We go on a journey with Dave that starts with stand up then moves to, of all things, clowning, and then deeper and deeper into a meta-mental breakdown. There’s a lot of sensitivity and vulnerability to Dave, despite his misogynistic instincts and I found myself feeling so much empathy for him despite reminding myself of my twitter replies after catching the attention of Men’s Rights Activists. There are so many layers here, and with it comes nuance in the commentary on being a female comedian, being a male comedian, challenges to privilege, feminism and identity.

 

I completely understand how Zoë has won multiple awards for this show, which has already toured extensively. It’s clever, socially aware comedy cut with bad puns, dick jokes and physical comedy that catches you by surprise. People will love it or hate it. I’m firmly in the love camp.

15
Sep
17

Orpheus

 

Orpheus

Brisbane Festival & Datacom

The Tivoli

September 12 – 16 2017

 

Reviewed by Stephanie Fitz-Henry

 

 

What do you get when you cross a 1930s jazz music club in the middle of Paris with a tragic tale of Greek mythology? A delightfully whimsical and uniquely entertaining theatre experience that is sure to remain with you for a long time.

 

As I enter through the doors of The Tivoli for the Australian premiere of Little Bulb Theatre and Battersea Arts Centre’s production of Orpheus, it feels like walking through the clubs of 1930s Paris after midnight. The instantly recognisable French accordion melodies fill the space and set the tone for laissez-faire. French fashion adorns the floor. The staff and many of the guests have embraced the invitation to dress in feathered headbands, strings of pearls, pinstriped vests, braces and berets.

 

 

The allure of the Tivoli is intoxicating with the anticipation of a night of fun and frivolity, which intensified with the show starting almost half an hour behind schedule in true French style – not that anyone seems to notice. The main auditorium is set in true cabaret style where groups can enjoy table service. The rest of the audience is seated in rows around the periphery. The performers encourage the audience to move around the room and to enjoy the wine and French inspired food throughout the duration of the show.

 

 

From the moment this company steps onto the stage until the final curtain call, the show is peppered with a myriad of laugh-out-loud moments that carry us from one action to the next. The moments of hilarity will tickle the funny bone of even the most cynical of spectators.

 

The performers are so hilarious and tragic that you can’t help but laugh and cheer them on. It’s like watching a silent film of the same era. The music takes centre stage and steers the direction of the piece for the duration of the show. The intentional choreography of simplistic movement and gesture, and melodramatic facial expressions, is like watching Baz Luhrmann’s Strictly Ballroom and is just as hysterical. The cast are all highly trained musicians who play double bass (Clare Beresford), violin (Miriam Gould), accordion (Shamira Turner), Piano/Organ (Charlie Penn), clarinet (Alexander Scott), percussion (Tom Penn) and guitar (Dominic Conway), who are led by the very funny and Peron-esque qualities of Eugenie Pastor (flute/swanee whistle). They skilfully use their comedic talents, physicality and harmonious voices to entertain us. The acts, scenes and settings are projected onto the stage to guide our journey amid the amusing commotion. 

 

The marriage of Hades and Persephone receives loud applause when re-enacted by 2 male cast members.

 

There is beauty and power in simplicity and this is one reason this production is so good. Clever use of striking costumes, props, puppets and masks (Max Humphries & Cheryl Brown), stunning lighting (Michael Odam) and an emotive set design (Mary Drummond) enhances and envelops the show. The focus is on the detail; its specificity brings authenticity to every moment of this production and conveys the company’s professionalism. The cast doesn’t take themselves seriously and performs the roles with incredible generousity, earning 2 curtain calls and a standing ovation.

 

All the way from the UK for the Brisbane Festival, this fabulous production is totally exclusive to Brisbane audiences for two final performances on Saturday at 2pm & 7:30pm. Orpheus is not just a show – it is an all-encompassing experience. Turn off the television and forget about the footy. This is the most fun you can have in 3 hours at the theatre and the best value ticket in town at Brisbane’s most cherished venue.

 

 

The Company

Double Bass: Clare Beresford

Guitar: Dominic Conway 

Violin: Miriam Gould

Piano/Organ: Charlie Penn

Percussion: Tom Penn

Flute/Swanee Whistle: Eugenié  Pastor 

Clarinet: Alexander Scott

Accordion: Shamira Turner 

 

The Orpheus Team

Written and Devised by: The Company
Directed by: Alexander Scott
Designer (Set & Costume): Mary Drummond
Sound Designer: Ed Clarke
Lighting Designer: Michael Odam
Mask and Puppets: Max Humphries and Cheryl Brown
Scenic Artist: Rebecca Chan
Production Manager: Daniel Palmer
Sound No.1: Thomas Wasley
Company Stage Manager: Laura Hammond
Deputy Stage Manager: Laura Page
Tech Swing: Mitch Hargreaves
Tour Producer: Rosie Scudder
Little Bulb Producer: Fiona Baxter

In association with Farnham Maltings

 

The VAN DIJK 3

Jan Van Dijk: Violin
Miranda Deutsch: Guitar
Rick Caskey: Bass

11
Sep
17

PER TE

 

PER TE

Brisbane Festival & Aurecon

QPAC Playhouse

September 9 – 16 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

She could tell a story through her eyes…

 

PER TE (Dedicated to you, dear Julie) is an astonishingly beautiful and tender production featuring charismatic acrobats with all the skills, and a circular set up of wind machines on stage to lift inanimate things into the air, creating breathtaking moments for little more reason than that it can be done. It’s perfect festival fare, a feast for the senses without making perfect sense. An Australian premiere, exclusive to Brisbane Festival thanks to David Berthold’s relationship with Compagnia Finzi Pasca (Switzerland), PER TE is almost a show and so much more than one. Can I even explain it? Do I even need to? I just want you to experience it.

 

Dramaturgically challenging for those looking to find a narrative thread through it, PER TE is unashamedly a work of sheer beauty, complex memories and raw emotion, dedicated to writer and director Daniele Finzi Pasca’s late wife, the visionary Julie Hamelin Finzi, who died last year after a long illness at the age of 43.

 

NEXT YEAR I WILL BE 43.

 

 

The profundity of this production is not in its circus tricks but in its arresting images within the aesthetic of a dream, or a dream of a dream, or of several dreams woven together over decades, with sheaths of white plastic floating and dancing above the stage, red and gold silks billowing and becoming fire-breathing dragons, frolicking, fighting…newspaper pages whirling, snowflakes swirling, an aerial hoop descending chillingly like a noose, and in the same instant containing all the beauty of the world, a thousand red rose petals twirling around it, tiny dancers in the air.

 

An entire sequence will stay with me forever, an extended anime fight, private, child-like – SCHOOM! – until the performer’s exhaustion sets in and she continues to fight – what? The world? Herself? – despite physical, mental and emotional fatigue, causing real tears to spill down my cheeks as I ache for her.

 

The second act opens with a plate spinning spectacular-spectacular, the stage filled like a field or a forest of light, or a jungle if we go by the sounds the acrobats make, with poles upon which the plates are placed and spun until they’re suddenly gone, and I don’t notice when they’re struck, or how, or by whom…the angel’s story has me captivated.

 

 

PER TE’s meta-premise lets us in on the secrets of creating a show and paying tribute to a life. With only a box of memories and a garden bench we are three months out from opening night, so things can change and there are members of the stage crew still moving props and set pieces about in plain sight, but basically the show exists, right? Why? And for whom? As the performers explain to the audience the way a show comes together, they reflect on their practice and the creative process. They play games, childlike in their glee, and they remember the things that Julie had said or done. The live music and vocal work is integral to the melting, sweeping, changing moods of the show. This “show” is in fact a love letter, a memoir; an homage to beauty, passion, love, belonging and longing.

 

 

When we begin we are in a garden, with a red garden bench and a darkened doorway, its edges lit. (Finzi Pasca’s Icaro also features a darkened doorway, which opens to the light). It reveals the performers, wearing suits of armour that weigh 30kg each, inhibiting movement, but not much, and adding clanks and creaks to the soundscape. At times it seems like something more will be made of the armour – at one point the tiniest female performer offers a guy his breastplate to put on, but there is no deeper meaning other than what we ourselves read into it, no extra moment there unless we ourselves choose to languish in it. At the end the armour is removed, piece by piece, and each performer lays it on the stage in front of them. This meaning is clear. But with a number of moments that seem less specific we can decide that either there are missed opportunities or that we have missed something that probably wasn’t meant for us in the first place. When such a deeply personal work is shared, we can either embrace it and find morsels we wish to keep forever for ourselves, or simply let it wash over us and look forward to the next festival piece.

 

PER TE is a private place of grief and glee and reverie and community, or a strange and visually stunning circus piece.

 

PER TE for me, more than a secret garden, is the distant memory of a series of decadent grown-ups’ dinner parties, which we would catch a glimpse of for years before being sent down the hall to bed; it’s magical, elusive and it might make more sense next time, or never.

 

09
Sep
17

[title of show]

 

[title of show]

Understudy Productions

Hayward Street Studios

August 31 – September 10 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

Jeff and Hunter, two struggling writers with nothing to lose, have decided to put everything on the line and create a show for New York Musical Theatre Festival. With the deadline for submissions a mere three weeks away, Jeff and Hunter decide to follow the old adage, “write what you know,” and set off on a unique musical adventure: writing a musical about writing a musical. With the help of their friends Susan, Heidi, and Larry on keys, they make a pact to write up until the festival’s deadline and dream about the show changing their lives.

 

[title of show] is one of the funniest productions to have been staged in Brisbane in a long time. I don’t know if this company saw Oscar Theatre Company’s production, directed by Emily Gilhome, in Brisbane in 2010 and Noosa in 2011 but this cast, directed by Ian Good, can hold their own.

 

 

Alexander Woodward’s Understudy Productions threw into the MELT Festival mix at Brisbane Powerhouse earlier this year an original cabaret (Boys of Sondheim), and now with Jeff Bowen and Hunter Bell’s [title of show] the company continues to provide professional work for local, Australian-based talent in another production that is LGBT and gender friendly. In the current political climate, a show about two gay guys writing a show about what matters to them and stuff that happens to them couldn’t be better placed.

 

Jackson McGovern plays an adorably goofy Hunter and Woodward is the perfect foil, an unassuming, charming Jeff. Together they go through the tumults of a working relationship and the closest kind of friendship, earning wide smiles, lots of laughter and our genuine affection.

 

 

 

Aurelie Roque is a wry, self-effacing Susan and Lauren McKenna a bold, bright and bubbly Heidi. Joel Curtis on keys is MD and an appropriately pacified Larry, and once again I feel like Larry should have more to say! Some of the best moments are in fact when the characters have nothing “scripted” to say. The girls soak up the spotlight during Secondary Characters during which they discuss what happens when the writers leave the room.

 

 

 

Die Vampire Die is still the best song of the show, possibly because it rings so true for artists, and Roque knows how to sell it. She easily elicits plenty of laughs and pathos within this number’s satisfying harmonies and hilarious lyrics. Curtis has ensured that each musical number is tight and while the pace lagged at times during the opening weekend, it will have picked up during the too-short season. It’s an exceptional cast; there’s no weak link and everyone has their turn to shine.

 

From Untitled Opening Number to Nine People’s Favorite Thing, this heartfelt, upbeat show is fun, irreverent and intelligent, and the perfect vehicle for these super talented triple threats. If you’re new to this musical, or to musicals in general, it’s likely you’ll miss some of the references to exisiting shows and Broadway stars, but that’s okay. While there’s nothing actually new happening here and the Hayward Street Studios’ space is a little unkind to such an intimate production, this [title of show] features five of our brightest. It’s highly entertaining and worth stealing a ticket to see tonight’s final performance; you’ll laugh out loud and leave grinning.

 

 

05
Sep
17

Cabaret de Paris is back!

 

MOULIN ROUGE STAR BRINGS PARISIAN BRILLIANCE TO BRISBANE

FOR THE RETURN OF CABARET DE PARIS

 

TWO SHOWS ONLY AT QPAC ON SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 9

 

 

 

A burlesque hip hop circus mash-up, a glamorous package of exotic dancers, illusionists, adagio performers and a razor-sharp resident clown.

 

After sold out shows in 2016, the glamorous Parisian revue show CABARET DE PARIS will return to Brisbane for two shows only on Saturday September 9. The two shows will be the only for Australia this year.

 

Cabaret De Paris is a stage spectacular celebrating old-fashioned showgirl glamour combined with the skill of adagio dancers, aerial pole artistry, comedy circus performers, quick change performers, illusionists and of course the famous French Cancan Dancers! (please note: the 2pm show will be covered, while the 7.30pm show is topless)

 

Australian born and trained Marissa Burgess, the longest-serving performer in the Moulin Rouge‘s 120-year history, stars in show. The legendary showgirl, with a string of accolades to her name, became the toast of Paris and the subject of many French TV talk shows and a US documentary. Marissa will be joined by the crème de la crème of showgirls, with dancers who have graced the stages of Moulin Rouge, The Lido and other French cabaret revues also featuring in the 90-minute production.

 

 

The show features over a quarter of a million dollars’ worth of lavish costumes crafted in traditional Paris style, with feathers, sequins, rhinestones and jewels (some covering barely anything)!

 

Cabaret de Paris is choreographed by Todd Patrick, one of Australia’s dance leaders who began his formidable career with Disney, before working for Versace, Dior, Issey Miyaki, Gucci and Chanel, across Europe and Asia. As a dancer he worked internationally, one of the highlights being the principal in The Lido in Paris.

 

Additionally, acclaimed illusionist and Australia’s Got Talent finalist Michael Boyd will perform some of his greatest illusions, mind-boggling disappearances and magic. Two shows only at QPAC on Saturday September 9.

 

 

05
Sep
17

short+sweet results 2017

 

Short+Sweet Festival 2017

Short+Sweet Qld & Brisbane Powerhouse

Brisbane Powerhouse

July 19 – August 5 & September 2&3 2017

 

Reviewed by Eleanora Ginardi

 

 

Who is your super hero”, “Mother I think I’m in love”, “Super Mario”,  Got it stuck in my head”, “Good bye Norma Jean”, “This bus is late, uncharted territory”, “Our daughter is an Emo” – Just some of the lines from the collection of 10 x 10 minute shows at Short+Sweet festival, held at the Brisbane Powerhouse in August.

 

This show presented works that were as diverse as a Merthyr road bus shelter. The evening hinged on the unexpected through showcasing local, Queensland emerging talent. Laughter and vulnerability held space together, with highlights being some of the solo acts which were uniquely brave and honest; performers jumping head-first into a sea of emotions and tugging us along for the journey. Many of the acts were inclusive in activating audience participation. As the shows progressed, the audience got more and more involved, immersing and plunging into the stories and experiences of  local artists.

 

The Hope Project, written, directed and performed by Scott Wings, delved deeply into the sense of belonging. Over and over, Scott kept asking and repeating and deconstructing what it means to belong, eventually blowing up the notion of belonging. BELONG, Belong. BEEEELOOONG. Beelong. BLONG BLONG BLONG BANG.

 

Another one act play which touched deeply was the very physical and disciplined performance by Jake Hollingsworth. The Theory of Emotion, written and directed by Jake, gracefully took us on a journey of life, exploring the ups and downs of being a mother from a creature-like world. Retelling the story of human existence and what its like to be a mother from a mans perspective physicalised and contemplated by a young mans body.

 

Another hard-hitter, Good night Daphne by Mathew Filkins explored overcoming abuse, and dug deeper into incapacitating any kind of abuse; be it physiological, emotional, physical, or often difficult to separate, slapping the audience in the face with a topic that is often difficult to talk about.

 

 

The last one act play was Quietus, presented by solo artist Caitlin Strongarm. Caitlin embodied a sadness and cajoled the audience to assist her in turning off an alarm high above her head which she couldn’t reach. Moments of extreme sadness and moments of genuine joy were presented in this solo that deservedly goes into the finals.

 

The stand-out group was Flowers Theatre Company with Murder Mansion, written by Gabriella Flowers, directed by Samantha Bull, assisted by Amy Randall, designed by Jaymee Richards, and performed by Gabriella Flower, Emily Vascotto, Ben Warren and Levi Wilcox. A clever satire with witty dialogue, the performance was exquisitely cast and played, beautifully costumed and fluently delivered by the entire cast.

 

An enjoyable evening with my friend Anne, who abandoned herself in the show along with the younger audience. As we went upstairs to Bar Alta and discussed the show over a hot chocolate we both felt equally as passionate the need to support the arts and give artist this platform to showcase their unique talent.

 

 

2017 RESULTS

BEST OVERALL PRODUCTION

Quietus

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

Songs For Sarah Connor (A Love Story, TERMINATED!)

BEST PLAY

Murder In The Mansion

BEST CABARET ACT

Shoes Wisely

BEST ACTOR

Caitlin Strongarm (Quietus)

BEST CABARET ARTIST

Drew Lochrie (Rock Pigs)

BEST NEW TALENT

Geordie McGrath (Shoes Wisely)

BEST SCRIPT

Say Yes

BEST DIRECTOR

Samantha Bull (Murder In The Mansion)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE/SONG

This Could Be You! (Sophie Banister)

BEST POSTER DESIGN

Be Entertaining