Posts Tagged ‘Theatre

07
Mar
14

Hamlet. Psyched

 

Hamlet. Psyched 

USC Drama

Chancellor College Performance Centre

Friday March 28 2014

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

How can we look after our own mental health?

 

 

IMG_1186

 

Drama Discipline Leader of USC, Jo Loth, wanted to make Hamlet relevant to her students and what better way than to incorporate MYTERN SMS?

 

MYTERN is an acronym for Take Emotional Responsibility Now. As part of her PhD studies, Jane Foster offered MYTERN SMS to the USC student community.

 

Foster has been running the service from her own mobile phone, offering daily text messages to students for inspiration, motivation, comfort and support.

 

Participants gave permission for their messages and feedback to be used for publishing purposes, and in this case, within Loth’s newly adapted production of Shakespeare’s classic tale of teen angst and a family in dissolve.

 

With two Hamlets on stage, a male and a female, the interpretations are interesting and not always as contrasting as one would think, though this may be due to shared rehearsal time and collaborative work on the character. A monologue is treated as dialogue, and there are times when I wonder about the effect of the role played solely by a female.

 

There is less need for the actors to raise their voices than they appear to think there is, with much of their shouting becoming ineffectual through over-application; we miss words and we cringe with Ophelia. These are young performers with minimal training and it shows, despite their best efforts to perform with gusto and fully commit to their roles. I’ll look forward to seeing them again in future, with a little more training and stage experience under their belts.

 

The Creative Industries Drama Major course is designed to produce entrepreneurs who can find or create work in a number of fields. Performance Skills Laboratory 1 (Acting 101) has brought them to a point where they are (mostly) confident in the space, however, I suspect lack of time has been a hindrance on students’ understanding of the text, and also with regard to connecting voice and body and character. We get a more fully realised performance from a mature age student, Lyn Stevenson; the same woman who stood out from the rest in USC Drama’s debut production, R&J (2013).

 

The production cleverly incorporates Foster’s research by giving students’ responses to her text messages to white clad ensemble figures in between the familiar scenes. The focus shifts from Hamlet to Ophelia, and her death, which brings a sudden change in pace and an unexpected conclusion. The ensemble, like a Greek Chorus or a shiver of sharks, circle Ophelia on her pedestal/coffin and take their places downstage to remind us that mental health is, indeed, a serious issue.

 

The template is potentially a wonderful resource for schools and community groups. It deserves further dramaturgical development and I’d love to see it receive the funds that would make publishing possible. This way, the (anonymous) personal stories can be easily incorporated, making the original story and local content relevant to entirely new audiences.

 

Loth has big ideas and at times very little to work with, but her gift is in going beyond our expectations and boldly challenging our notions of what theatre is and what role it plays within contemporary society. The potential of performance, to change how we see the world and each other, is evident in each original production Loth undertakes.

 

10
Aug
12

Catharsis – premieres in Noosa tonight!

Catharsis

U.S. based team brings international artists, three artistic mediums and a local cause together for one night only

Catharsis Synopsis

Los Angeles based production team Jeremy Culver (writer/director) and Charleene Closshey (composer/actress), along with acclaimed portrait artist, Jeffry Feeger will bring the world premiere of a new stage play, Catharsis, to The J Theatre Noosa tonight, Friday 10 August, 2012.

Listen HERE

The Catharsis concept combines drama, music and live painting on stage with each show featuring a unique, local subject angle. After the Noosa show, Catharsis will tour the world with shows planned for New York, Vancouver, Los Angeles and London in 2013. Whilst scripted, due to the unique subject matter in each location no two shows will ever be the same.

“Catharsis fuses the storytelling mediums of film and music with the romance of live portrait painting and drama, and then combines this with a philanthropic aspect to form a traditional theatre experience, said Jeremy.

“Our goal with each show is obviously for the audience to be entertained, but also to have some sort of cathartic experience, which is really the aim of all drama.”

Catharsis Moy Sweetman

Moy Sweetman, Founder of Frangipani Dreams

The inspiration for Noosa’s Catharsis will be the story of local charity founder, Moy Sweetman of Frangipani Dreams. The actors and audience will first ‘meet’ Moy on stage and hear her story via pre-recorded video interviews and audio clips. The narrative will then be integrated into the drama informing the nature of the acting and music. Simultaneously, Sweetman’s image will be painted live on stage by artist, Jeffry Feeger. The painting will be made available for sale at a future date.

Charleene, Jeremy and Jeffry first workshopped the concept of the show last year in California. They decided to premiere the show in Noosa due to the region’s well established reputation as a town both familiar and appreciative of the arts and because of the team’s personal connection with Moy – whom they met through local producer, Rae Smart.

“The unique format of Catharsis means that the audience’s money is retained by the local community and will be used for a greater purpose long after our show leaves town, Charleene said.

“We’ve heard so many wonderful things about Noosa including the community’s love of the arts and its generosity toward local causes.”

CATHARSIS FAST FACTS:

* Drama, music and live painting on stage

* Friday, 10 August 2012

* Play: 8:00PM – 10:PM (with intermission)

* After show soiree. Meet the actors and artist and viewing of Jeffry’s painting. Entertainment by Aussie-Swedish independent duo ‘Nick and Liesl’. Drinks available for purchase.

* The J Theatre * Tickets: $30. Net proceeds of ticket sales and the sale of the painting will be donated directly back to Frangipani Dreams.

* For more information visit www.catharsislive.com

Charlene Closshey

Charleene Closshey

Charleene Closshey (SAG/AEA/BMI) is a performing artist in the truest sense of the word – a classically trained composer, violinist and vocalist, a stage and screen actor, and music and stage producer with training from Juilliard, NYU, and Circle in the Square. Recent screen credits include feature film “A Thousand Cuts”, television pilot “Terminal Kill”, and art film “Walking with Francis”. Stage credits include the original Los Angeles productions of “A War Cycle: Wounded” and “Sherwood Forrest” (world premiere), with lead roles in U.S. productions of “The Wild Party”, “Nine”, “Hair” and “Jekyll & Hyde”. A classically trained violinist, Charleene fuses jazz, rock, pop, blues, and swinging fiddle, sharing the stage with artists including Josh Groban, Charlie Daniels, Frank Sinatra, Jr., and the TransSiberian Orchestra. As a vocalist, Charleene has performed with Operafestival di Roma in Rome, Italy. Various albums available on iTunes.com and Amazon.

AJ Meijer

AJ Meijer

AJ Meijer (SAG/AEA) co-founded the Los Angeles Theatre Ensemble and was seen most recently in their productions of “The War Cycle: Wounded”, “The War Cycle: Nation of Two”, and “The War Cycle: Gospel According to First Squad”, for which he was nominated for an Ovation Award. Regionally, he last appeared as Lennie in “Of Mice and Men” at TheatreWorks, Silicon Valley. He has performed at the Ahmanson Theatre (LA) and spent four seasons performing at the Getty (LA), where he worked with the National Theatre of Greece in “Swallow Song” and created the role of Bigbuxo in the hilarious original musical “Tug of War”. AJ earned his theatre degree from the UCLA School of Theatre, Film, and Television. He also co-hosts a weekly, industry-focused podcast called Inside Acting

Jeffry Feeger

Jeffry Feeger

JEFFRY FEEGER – The Painter About Jeffry Feeger: Jeffry is one of the most exciting young contemporary visual artists to emerge from the Pacific region. From Papua New Guinea and largely self-taught, his work in realism has been met with high critical acclaim and has been seen all over the world, including galleries in China, UK, Africa, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. As a skilled live performance painter, he is the reigning champion of the Shanghai Artist Battle 2010, a live performance competition including artists from all over the globe. He’s recently taken his exciting brand of live painting into various public spaces, performing in front of Sydney’s iconic Opera House and at the UN Women’s Exhibit during the Pacific Art Festival in Honiara, July 2012. An inspirational young figure for people in his country, Jeffry routinely collaborates with performers from a variety of unique backgrounds to share the stories he finds passionate. Jeffry’s art is sold worldwide. www.JeffryFeegerArt.com

Jeremy Culver

JEREMY CULVER

Jeremy Culver is a Los Angeles-based writer and director known for delving into topics surrounding Truth and Love in environments of change, blending multimedia mediums to explore life’s mythical stories. His most recently completed art film, Walking with Francis, supposes the last days of St. Francis of Assisi, and has already received critical acclaim with Italian audiences. Currently in production is the documentary, Radical Kindness (featuring Martin Sheen), chronicling the life of Monsignor John Sheridan. Concurrently in pre-production is the feature film Evergreen, a romantic comedy about a musician who returns home to life on the Christmas tree farm and finds her true voice (from the Producers of Hit and Run in theatres August 2012), shooting January 2013.

Jeffry Catharsis

Charleene Jeffry Catharsis

Frangipani Dreams

19
Apr
12

A quick question for teachers and school management peeps

I’ll get back to this – there’s the school run and then another sold-out performance of Travelling North to do – but first, just quickly, I had to copy and paste from Facebook, my status lamenting the lack of school groups in attendance at Empire Theatre Project’s April’s Fool this morning at Nambour Civic Centre.

I’d love for you to weigh in on this one. It continues to baffle me. It continues to frustrate me. Please let me know what it takes to get a school group (and not just the drama classes) to attend life-affirming, life-changing, life-saving theatre on the Sunshine Coast. I commend those schools who support their staff in doing so regularly. I’d love to hear from you too!

Dear everybody who is actually still doing party drugs and everybody with a child over the age of twelve on the Sunshine Coast, if you can possibly get to it tonight, go see APRIL’S FOOL with them at Nambour Civic Centre at 7:30pm for 75 minutes of your time. This show is already saving lives. Absolutely incredible storytelling. My heartfelt congrats go to Lewis Jones, David Burton, et al. As Poppy would say, “my heart hurts…”

Dear secondary school teachers and principals, if you didn’t book to take your students to see APRIL’S FOOL at Nambour Civic Centre today, SHAME ON YOU!

I know some students are attending tonight’s performance and I know that one teacher tried to arrange for her students to see this show and the excursion policy had not been signed off on! 

Hmmm… Does council need an education liaison person (or whatever) to let schools know what they’re missing (or to let schools know what they can’t afford to miss)?

Teacher friends, is it just getting too hard to do excursions? Do you need the info sooner? You would have seen the details for April’s Fool in your pigeon hole in October last year and I know you’ve got Boy Girl Wall now. Do you need assurance that the show is good?

Please tell me what it is you need in order to get your students to these shows! I’d really like to know. Thanks.

 

14
Apr
12

one day this blog will win something

It’s true. I believe it. It will happen. Our thoughts make our world and all that stuff. 

To show your support for the conversations we have here, for the growth of the arts industry, for the vibrant, talented artists who inform and inspire this blog,

VOTE

for us in the Best Australian Blogs 2012 Competition: People’s Choice Award.

VOTING CLOSES ON THURSDAY 9TH MAY AT 5:00pm

Over 940 blogs were nominated in this section of the competition! We are one of the few arts industry blogs and we are the only one under ‘X’ so it’s easy to find us and vote for us. You can vote for as many blogs as you like but you can only submit your voting form ONCE. I included in our own submission, votes for some of the other fabulous blogs we love (and look, we do like to share the love). You’ll notice that these are not entertainment blogs at all – oh no – these are the downtime blogs; the gorgeous random ramblings of writers who we don’t tend to see in foyers of theatres across Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast!

Remember, voting will close Wednesday 9th May at 5.00 pm.

All winners will be announced on Thursday 10 May at 10.00 am. The winner of the People’s Choice Award will receive $1000 worth of courses (online or face-to-face) at the Sydney Writers’ Centre in Milsons Point. Fantastic!

Winner of the Best Australian Blogs Competition 2011, our amazing friend and professional blogger, Styling You’s Nikki Parkinson, spoke about her win.

I love what Nikki has to say about QUALITY and CREDIBILITY. Nikki is an inspiration.

The official Twitter hashtag for the 2012 competition is #bestblogs2012. You can follow the Sydney Writers’ Centre at @SydneyWriters for the Best Australian Blogs Competition announcements.

10
Mar
12

so what will the state theatre company of the future look like?

Well now, let’s see. It’s Friday and the Forum (and the opening of The Greenhouse) was Thursday. It seems like an eternity ago! I’ve been busy, yes (I’m always busy) but I’ve been thinking. I’ve been listening to a lot of John Bucchino again lately and this is the core of what I came away thinking (and singing) during the drive back to the coast and upon getting home and going to bed instead of blogging until 2am…

RHYME IS WHAT IT DOESN’T HAVE TO DO UNLESS WE WANT IT TO

When we look at the state theatre companies across the country, do we not think they all look a bit like this?

Yes. It’s a neat street.

Of course the vision for the QTC of the future varies enormously, depending on who you ask to paint the picture. The many, many, MANY pictures are wonderful! And at least we all seem to agree that we would prefer to see something more like this:

And because we know we can, we want to feel that we are creating work that helps us to look like this:

Imagine what the street would look like if our state theatre companies all followed their dreams and each became a true home to their artists, producing sustainably, a vast array of work in traditional and non-traditional spaces, which truly reflected their communities; their people, their stories, their hopes, their dreams and their realities.

WOW!

So my point is this: it’s time to drop a great big bloody bucket of orange paint over each of our state theatre companies!

If there’s an Artistic Director game to do it, it’s Wesley Enoch. He has, better than any other as far as I’m concerned, established a firm platform of community engagement and open public forum. Wait. To trump Cate, he may have to appear on a community group’s stage himself somewhere, say in Ipswich…

Some stakeholders prefer to take a similar approach to that of Lucas Stibbard’s, by taking a look at what we don’t want. This is a fine approach to begin with; ruling out what’s not desired and leaving us with the perfect picture! Easy! But there’s no perfect picture, as we know. And that’s why it’s so hard to make the changes. What if we start small? What if we don’t even call our subscribers “subscribers”? Are they not now “season ticket holders”? Language and perception are two of the big orange splots within the bigger picture.

A number of artists mentioned that we might do better to look at the sporting model in Queensland. This is something that Sam (my husband) has been saying for years. A rare breed, he loves his sport AND the arts. Depending on the season and whether or not the art is paying, one will always win out.

Anyway, Paul Bishop, our extraordinary facilitator for the afternoon’s forum (really, he should have his own morning show), introduced by Associate Director of QTC, Todd MacDonald, gave us a brief history of the world’s culture and asked us to fill in the blanks for the last 50 – 60 years, specifically for Brisbane theatre. What? Oh, right. To appreciate where we are now and where we’re headed, we need to understand what’s gone before us. Fair enough.

So we had our afternoon’s schedule on a whiteboard and, armed with coloured felt pens, A4 paper, post-its (and iPhones), although we were already running 15 minutes late, we were ready to change the world!

We realised, after just a few minutes, that there has been far richer theatrical culture in Brisbane than many realise, for much longer than some care to remember. Kaye Stevenson commented that resilient artists have continued to work for a long time in this town. What a timely reminder (mentioned again later, during the Welcome to Country from Uncle Des and the opening address from Wesley Enoch) that we must keep asking our elders what has happened before us. We must be willing to listen and take down their stories. We must re-tell them. We must continue to value that which has gone before. I don’t doubt that we do, just as I don’t doubt that there is anyone who doesn’t want to do things better than they’ve been done before.

The question of sustainability was a major one – it kept coming up in conversation – and it took David Walters, the master of green lighting design (and by green I mean sustainable and not for Wicked), to point out that we had full lights on in the room for the day, for a discussion, rather than all of us looking like death-warmed-up under the ugly lights (he didn’t say anything about looking like death-warmed-up but we all know that’s the issue here).

The theatre is an aesthetic thing! Nobody wants to be photographed under the fluoros!

Luke Jaaniste spoke of the theatre company being more a part of our entire ecosystem, a living, breathing, feeding, inter-dependent organism, though his paper reads more clearly about this than his brief address to us on the day and I urge you to go back and read it. Lisa Erhart gave us the Galaxy Analogy and poignantly noted that she is one of the cool, older, red stars within our galaxy, while there are others involved who are the hot, new, young blue stars. She wants us to smash the elite theatre culture that appears to be – still – associated with the company and for it to become far greater reaching and responsive to community. Anna Molnar used the term “theatre without borders” and also noted, later, that to trademark it or copyright it would defeat its purpose. It was noted that the only “colour” in the room was in the paper and pens. Todd MacDonald summarised that the state theatre company has a responsibility to raise standards and tell the stories that truly reflect our community. This came up repeatedly. In Farmer Rob’s words, we must start to “sell to the farmers.”

Rob spoke about farmers who sing – they’re happier – and have “thrown out the farm”. (I’m waiting to see the link for this organisation and when I do, I’ll add it here.) This became more relevant as we began discussing the traditional space, the buildings and that “elite” culture of pre-booking, dressing “appropriately” and going to dinner and a show. Todd asked, “Should we lose the mothership?” There was deathly silence. As Wesley honed in on later, the place is significant. It’s important to have a home for artists and a place where people can gather together. As a little, tiny, independent company who floats from theatre to theatre, to Boreen Point, to Community Hall, to park, to beach, to living room, to vacant shop, I know this to be true. We feel it. All the time.

IMHO a company needs a place to call home.

The need to re-structure the company came up several times, with artists wanting artists paid first. Fair enough. On the other hand, it was acknowledged that admin need to be able to sell a show in order for the artists to have an audience! Andrea Moor said the company should be one that, “serves the fans and the artists first.” She also wants to see, as we all do, the companies working together. I don’t doubt this is happening more than ever before, with the dialogue now wide open between QTC and La Boite.

Emma Bennison spoke on behalf of Access Arts and expressed her frustration (echoed by many others in the room and on Twitter) at the funding bodies favouring young and emerging artists for far too long. She reminded us that it’s distressing for her sector of the community to see able-bodied actors playing characters with disabilities. There are actors with disabilities who are not even being considered for these roles. I was waiting for Suer Manger to pipe up. Emma also stated, quite rightly, that we can’t possibly become a more inclusive and accessible company while we continue to make assumptions about people (artists) with disabilities.

Angharad Wynne-Jones joined us via Skype (Sigh. There are always technical difficulties, aren’t there?) and shared with us these words:

We need to balance fear and hope. We need to do things better and differently. We need to hold hands before the paradigm shift.

And a wonderful, quirky, living room work, choreographed by Lucy Guerin for the homeartproject.com

Matt Delbridge spoke about London’s Green Theatre Project, citing excellent examples to balance the horrific stats of energy use (read waste) by theatres everywhere. You only have to Google “green theatre” to find enough material to occupy your reading time until Arcola Theatre becomes the first carbon neutral theatre in the world. And they will. Check out what they’re doing – for their theatre family and for their wider community – here. Our own Umber Productions achieved a small miracle with David Walters lighting their production of Elaine Acworth’s Water Wars. Their Education Pack provides nice, simple detail about how this was done. I wish the writers and implementers of the new you-beaut rigid bloody curriculum would see more theatre. Just saying.

“I limited the amount of power used. I know it was a kind of arbitrary thing, but I set myself the task – and the show was a touring piece – to run from a 10 AMP (domestic) socket. It simplified things.”

Walters told Kate Foy that the biggest challenge in Water Wars was, ‘getting my head around this approach to lighting. I don’t know of anyone else who’s taken it on. It’s challenging – bloody and dangerous at times but, at other times, very rewarding.’ He continues, ‘… and just because we have the tools doesn’t mean it’s good design. I’m conscious of LEDs being fitted in to what we’ve always known. We’re in transition. We’re in a catchup game now and, for the first time, we have tools we don’t quite know what to do with. We’ve now got computers which have given us extraordinary and sophisticated ways of controlling that light, once we’ve generated it.

Where I am learning is in the area of control. There are old ways of doing things but now there is so much flexibility. For example, there are 60, 80, 100s of channels of control. I’m having to learn to re-think in design terms.’

Right. What have I missed? What we believe is essential to the state theatre company of the future. And the observations from Steven Mitchell Wright. Hmmm. Could have heard a pin drop. Steven said aloud a lot of what has been unspoken. In order to move forward, QTC need to address a lot of problems.  He is an advocate for adapting our language and our labels to better represent the stakeholders. He sees a need for greater depth and transparency in the engagement with community and while he acknowledges that the discussions, debates and forums are happening already, QTC now need to genuinely respond and make the tough calls to bring about real change for artists.
Since I’m still up and here, here is a little something from Travis Bedard, in the middle of the current #2amt discussion (if you’re in theatre and not on Twitter yet, IT’S TIME), re the problem with theatre in America. I include it because we all have to remember that we all have something to do with making changes for a better future. That sounds awfully trite but, especially in our theatrical circles, I get sick to death of hearing the sneering and judgement before support and admiration for our fellow artists. Be a part of the change. Be the change you want to see. Stop wasting paper. Turn off the lights. Get to a show via public transport. Make braver, better, smarter choices. Keep creating new work. Keep sharing the work. Share the love MORE.
QTC is not UNloved. Far from it! We just don’t know how to show our love sometimes.
“You understand of course, given the size of this niche, there’s an almost 50% chance that YOU are a problem with theatre in America?”
-Travis Bedard
No problem here! No problems that are not being addressed, anyway. Keep supporting, sharing and inspiring change. The changes will come about because we continue to challenge, adapt and evolve. Meanwhile, The Greenhouse, the youth ensemble, Wesley’s regular newsletters and the engagement with community give me confidence that QTC are serious about change. For the first time, they are questioning – from the inside – the necessity of rhyme. The state theatre company of the future looks like it’s genuinely open to suggestions and will look very different if we just give them a chance and a bit of encouragement along the way. We need to keep reminding them:
RHYME IS WHAT IT DOESN’T HAVE TO DO UNLESS WE WANT IT TO
And we need to remember that sometimes, half of the audience – even the invited guests amongst them – are not going to find your art interesting, regardless of the changes you make. This actually happened last night, to my, er, horror. They will continue talking and drinking, regardless of what or who you have put on the stage in front of them. But no problem. Not everybody watches the grand final, either. Let’s not be so precious, let’s not waste time and resources dwelling on it (let’s not decide to leave them off the guest list for the next opening, which was one suggestion I overheard in the more attentive section of The Greenhouse crowd); let’s just get on with the show and bring on the theatre companies of the future.
Check out the forum gallery here and on Facebook.
18
Apr
11

INFLUENCE: AN UPDATE

Interview with the director: Sam Coward

Sunday 17th April 

Influence opened in Noosa on Friday night. You’ve had 3 sold-out performances to start the season. How do you feel? 

Very satisfied, especially considering where the show is at, where ticket sales are at and the level at which the public and critical responses have been. We’re in a good place!

Were there any obstacles or hiccups to overcome to get to this stage? 

It’s been a relatively painless process. Illness at the eleventh hour made me a little nervous but generally speaking, with the level of competence in my cast and the level of wisdom in Williamson’s words, it all went pretty smoothly.

Opening Night highlights?

It was the first time in a long time that I’ve been able to sit in the bio box and see the audience’s immediate reactions and feel the buzz – it was electrifying and very satisfying.

So what’s your role during the run?

Because I’m a control freak and because, for the technical accuracy of this show, a degree of intimacy with the script was required, I decided I wanted to manually operate the lights for Influence.

When did you stop giving notes?

 Today. Today the show reached a level that I felt couldn’t be enhanced or improved upon. This is not to say that I won’t be giving any further notes during the run, this just means I’m giving no more notes, at this stage, until further notice.

What’s your favourite thing about this show?

I would have to say that’s it’s probably that the end result is so close to the vision I had from the outset. This production has stayed true to the original picture and it’s exciting to see that a) we’ve been able to do that and b) other people like it too.

Is there anything you would have done differently?

I would have put somebody else in the box early enough to learn the cues.

I really think the time invested in character early on is shining through now. We used the time we had very well. The performances are genuine. 

I’ve felt very confident, almost relaxed, which is really rare. Usually tech week is all horror but it was seamless. It’s been a relatively easy ride. I feel like I just had to sell the vision and then discuss characters with the cast, design…in fact, the biggest part of my job was at the front end. 

The playwright, David Williamson, is attending on the final night, a special gala evening to celebrate his 40 years’ involvement at Noosa Arts Theatre on April 30th. How do you feel about him seeing the show?

I’m very excited about that actually, because from our first discussions with him, he was intrigued as to how we were going to do this. Even Michael Futcher acknowledged that he’s not heard of anyone trying to do a Williamson in this way. I’m interested to get David’s reaction and I hope we can do his 40 Year Celebration justice. I’m quietly confident that we will. The way in which we are staging Influence is truly honouring the text and trusting that Australia’s greatest playwright is acknowledged as such for a reason. I don’t have to hide anything or do anything with smoke and mirrors because it’s enough on its own. And while I’m arrogant, I’m not arrogant enough to think there’s anything I can do with it that will improve on what’s already there. So with a text and a cast of this caliber how could I go wrong?

What’s next for you?

Hmmm. It’s a mystery.

David Williamson’s Influence continues at Noosa Arts Theatre until April 30th. To enquire about any remaining tickets, please call the box office (07) 5449 9343

30
Jan
11

Are We Done With January Already?!

Wow, do I have some catching up to do! Here is the year so far:

  • Woodford Folk Festival was the wettest ever and this made it…different fun.
  • The devastating impact on friends and fellow artists of the most recent rains prompted us to help clean up at Drift and in Dayboro, as well as to collect from Sunshine Coast peeps, donations of basic items and treats to send to those who had lost everything in the floods. We ended up packing and delivering over 500 Happy Packs, which went to communities in places such as Murphy’s Creek, Bundaberg, the Bremer River, Withcott and Grantham.
  • I started reviewing Brisbane’s shows for briztix.com (and have received no hate mail yet) #WIN
  • I accepted the role of Carmela, in Influence, David Williamson’s highest grossing play, which will run for 3 weeks in April at Noosa Arts Theatre
  • I planned two entirely different courses for actors on the Sunshine Coast and scrapped them both because I felt I was missing something.
  • In the meantime, I will run Wednesday evenings from 7pm-8pm at Dance Edge Studios, for adult actors and non-actors who need SOMETHING. Or, perhaps that should be SOMETHING ELSE. Let’s call it The Soup Kitchen and I’ll provide metaphorical soup for the actors’ souls and basic skills for your survival. When I move – and I’ll let you know when that is – I’ll provide actual soup. Stone Soup. On Sundays. At home. In the kitchen. Y’all bring something to go into the soup, now.
  • I’m teaching acting and vocal classes at Dance Edge Studios and coaching aspiring young actors and singers in the lead up to the eisteddfod season and in preparation for exams, auditions, school productions, community theatre and the like. If you feel anything like I feel about the eisteddfods especially, you will understand the need for a bit of efficient, gentle coaching from Day 1.
  • My daughter started at Montessori last week. She is most impressed that she gets to cut her own fruit for morning tea and that she may have morning tea whenever she is hungry. This has let her get away in the mornings without having Proper Breakfast. This is about to change. She also likes having tiny hot pink foot stickers, with her name printed on them, inside her shoes.
  • The same daughter (there’s only one, for pretty obvious scheduling reasons) starts hip hop, acro, jazz and ballet this week (swimming lessons have already been re-scheduled). It will be hard for me to be just the mama waiting for her to do classes sooo…I guess I just gained 2 extra hours a week for your private lessons, kids!
  • In the interests of my own life-long learning, I’m up for some Practical Aesthetics, Impulse Training and a whole lot more Chubbuck this year.
  • And last but not least – for now – I’m gathering some brave people and some horrific stories this year, for a verbatim theatre project that we’ll keep calling Suicide Stories, even though I’ve already received warnings to lay off this topic. Is suicide the last taboo then? Good. We’re going there. If you’re interested in coming on this journey – and it’s going to be a tough one – let me know. We’ve got the ball rolling and the tears flowing freely. It’s all good…in a sort of terrifying, confronting, heart-wrenching way.

It’s gonna be a big year. But then every year is a big year! Bring it!