Posts Tagged ‘queensland cabaret festival

10
Jun
16

Michael Griffiths: COLE

 

Michael Griffiths: COLE

Brisbane Powerhouse & Queensland Cabaret Festival

Brisbane Powerhouse Visy Theatre

5 June 2016

Reviewed by Katy Cotter

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Ok. Hold the phone. Have you heard of Michael Griffiths? You need to. He is a singer, pianist, actor, composer and musical arranger who studied at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA). He has performed in numerous musicals such as Priscilla Queen of the Desert, We Will Rock You, Shout, and my all time favourite, Jersey Boys. He played the role of Bob Crewe four years running for which he was nominated for a Green Room Award for Best Supporting Actor. This man is pure talent. 

It was my first time seeing Griffiths perform on a rainy night on the 5th of June, though it was warm and cosy inside the Visy Theatre at the Powerhouse. I felt like I was entering a secret underground jazz club. A grand piano sat on stage with a crystal glass and a bottle containing brown liquor, not too far out of reach. Soft amber light filled the room. A somewhat devious audience member discovered the crystal bottle contained not alcohol but tea. I should hope so, for Griffiths needed to wet the whistle quite a few times. Perhaps we would have seen a very different side of Cole Porter.

Yes, the star of the show is Mr. Cole Porter, an American composer and songwriter. He was classically trained but found his heart was drawn to musical theatre and by the 1930s he was one of the major songwriters on Broadway. I admit I had no prior knowledge of Porter, but as soon as Griffiths began singing his songs, my memory was triggered and my ears filled with familiar sounds. One of his more popular musical hits is Anything Goes, though I was recognising songs such as Love for Sale, I’ve Got You Under My Skin and You’re the Top.

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Griffiths embodies Cole Porter with oodles of class and charisma. This one man cabaret, superbly written by co-creator and best-selling author, Anna Goldsworthy, takes the audience on a journey through Porter’s very colourful and somewhat controversial life in the spotlight. The highs soar effortlessly in the clouds with mesmerising melodies and witty banter, and the lows are handled with a tender subtlety by Griffiths, making sure the mood is not too dark and dreary. The show must go on, as they say.

This is one of those shows that I urge people to see because it’s a darn good time, and this is an artist who I utterly admire and respect (and somewhat envy). There was not one moment where I was bored, or wondering how far into the show we were, or thinking about my bladder exploding. I was utterly captivated by Michael Griffiths. And I was upset I didn’t bring my mum but there’s one more chance to see Griffiths – at Noosa arts Theatre on July 23 – before he heads to Edinburgh Fringe Festival! 

Book here to see COLE during Noosa Long Weekend Festival

10
Jun
16

The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust

 

The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust

Brisbane Powerhouse & Queensland Cabaret Festival 

Brisbane Powerhouse Performance Space

June 4 2016

Reviewed by Katy Cotter 

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Electric Moon’s spectacular show returned to the Brisbane Powerhouse for one night only as a part of Queensland Cabaret Festival, honouring the late and amazing David Bowie, and playing one of his greatest albums in its entirety. The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars was Bowie’s fifth studio album released in 1972, a concept album telling the story of a fictional rock star named Ziggy Stardust.

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The atmosphere in the Powerhouse Theatre was electric and I was sitting next to hardcore Bowie fans. A young girl had the iconic lightning bolt painted boldly across her face and she was talking excitedly to her mother about her favourite songs. Tickets were hard to grab a hold of, and no wonder. After Bowie’s tragic death back in January, this show’s popularity and importance has obviously grown dramatically. I could sense a unity within the room, that this incredible musician had changed lives. People had come from all over to celebrate the man as well as the music and they were certainly not disappointed.

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There is no denying the album is ‘far out there’ great with each song being a hit, but the performance was just supreme. The cast included 20 of Brisbane’s finest musicians. The eight lead vocals honestly blew me away, each embodying their own creation of Bowie’s songs. Lucinda Shaw was magnificent and dangerous as she took the stage first to sing Five Years. I thought to myself, “Can it get better than this? This woman is a freaking powerhouse at the Powerhouse!” It certainly did get better; the wind was knocked out of every audience member as the stunningly beautiful Emma Dean sang a soft and eerie version of Starman. Now there was one performer, Maria DeVita who seemed of a different breed. She was absolutely wild, stomping across the stage like a punk chic goddess while singing Hang on to Yourself. She almost made me want to start a mosh pit. Lastly, I have to mention my favourite was Daniel Hack. I hung on every word as he reached out to the audience, taking us along for the ride to outer space. His vocals were incredible and if I closed my eyes, there were moments I could swear Bowie was singing.

The show clearly would not go on without the 12 amazing musicians playing guitars, piano, strings, percussion, the list goes on! Where many are fixed on the singer, my eye tends to wander. Unfortunately I don’t know the name of the beautiful lady on piano but she was the personification of joy. As her fingers danced across the ivory keys, her smile grew wider and I just wanted to run up and sit next to her. What a talent! My grandmother would have killed to have a piano-off with this woman. Is that even possible?

If these guys return, buy a ticket. You’ll leave feeling all the emotions, but all of David Bowie’s music seems to have that effect. I actually wanted to sneak back in and see the late show. I can’t imagine how exhausted and elated the cast must feel after two back-to-back shows. They are all simply terrific, and this show is a great night out. Vale Bowie.

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08
Jun
16

I Get the Music In You: An Evening with Jan van de Stool

 

I Get the Music In You:

An Evening With Jan van de Stool

Brisbane Powerhouse & Queensland Cabaret Festival

Brisbane Powerhouse Theatre

 

Reviewed by Katelyn Panagiris

 

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Queenie van de Zandt as the cult character Jan van de Stool – International Musical Therapist, Interpretive Dancer and Singing Psychologist – graces our stage in I Get The Music In You, presented by Queensland Cabaret Festival and Brisbane Powerhouse.

 

First conceived on Brisbane soil in 2005, van de Zandt has since entertained audiences from across the country with her Dutch-Australian satirical self-help guru, Jan van de Stool. Jan is hilarious in her unique methods (“colonic irrigation of the spirit”), occasional misuse of the English language and her deliberate avoidance of the “big notes”. After all, as Jan suggests, belting is called belting for a reason.

 

From the first moments of our evening with Jan van de Stool, we understand that we’re going to be in for a wild ride; you may merely miss being insulted by Jan, but you won’t avoid dancing along to Wind Beneath My Wings with her not-so-interpretative-interpretative dance moves. Nor will you avoid being hypnotised into purchasing a glorious Jan van de Stool barbecue apron, or paying for your sneaky biscuit from the packet of Arnott’s Family Assorted Biscuits in the break room. And finally, you won’t avoid being subjected to a new age world of musical therapy where anything is possible, and if you happen to be really good, you’re probably not going to get a chance to perform (otherwise you may just outshine Jan).

 

In this way, van de Zandt masterfully enrolls the audience as participants in a one-day beginners course where everyone is given a run down of the basics – from stepping into your very own “golden shower” to releasing the tension in your hand by…screaming at your hand. The audience is obviously enthralled by van de Zandt’s deadpan monotonous performance as Jan van de Stool; they are fully participative, amused and outraged as joke after joke and song after song flows from van de Zandt.

 

There is something very familiar and distinctly Australian about this character that appears to win over the affection of the audience. In this role van de Zandt shines as an experienced and versatile vocalist and performer.

 

She gracefully transforms her whole being as she transitions from one character to the next, giving short performances as Jan van de Stool’s unique graduates. In these moments we have an opportunity to relish in the hilarity of Jan and her pupils, but also an opportunity to appreciate van de Zandt’s beautifully captivating voice (which is rather dissimilar to Jan Van de Stool’s).

 

I Get The Music In You is a witty, satirical cabaret shedding light on the wonderful world of musical therapy. It’s a fun evening that will have you laughing out loud to the absurdity of Jan van de Stool in all her wisdom.

 

15
Jun
15

Rob Mills Is…Surprisingly Good

 

Rob Mills Is…Surprisingly Good

Brisbane Powerhouse, Queensland Cabaret Festival

& Mackay Entertainment And Convention Centre

Powerhouse Theatre

Sunday June 14 2015

 

 Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

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Rob Mills Is…Surprisingly Good. It’s a humble, slightly bemused premise on which to base a show (they’re the words of critics of course), and it works. Mills is sensational, surprising East Coast audiences with his self-deprecating humour, natural musical ability and charisma. Anyone who has seen Mills in a musical theatre production, as Jamie (The Last Five Years), Fiyero (Wicked), Warner (Legally Blonde) or Danny (Grease), won’t be nearly as surprised as the rest. Again, this time within the challenging realm of cabaret, Mills shows his mettle.

 

I loved how they put the word grease in the hair of the logo. It made it exciting as soon as we sat down. The direction was beautiful and the song Sandy almost made me cry in Mum’s lap. Sandy is a beautiful song and Rob Mills sang it perfectly. I’m sure I saw the movie, but I thought this version was much better than the movie.

 

– Poppy Eponine

 

robmillsparishiltonThe “not really a Rodgers and Hammerstein kind of guy” clearly has a ball sharing his personal stories, which stem from a childhood of singing and playing guitar, and a heap of pub gigs followed by his 15 minutes thanks to Australian Idol, and an eclectic assortment of rock songs and musical theatre faves. The show is loosely based around notions of Dancing Through Life (Wicked), [He] Knew You Were Trouble (Taylor Swift) and finding one’s Purpose (Avenue Q).

 

We’ve seen and heard a lot from Mills via TV and THOSE headlines, and he doesn’t shy away from any of it, in fact he relishes all of it (even a boy band medley moment, which is GOLD); he reminisces and laughs with us.

 

 

He’s unashamed and beyond reproach. He’s dancing through life, and why not?

 

Striking the perfect note, Mills opens with Live in Living Colour (Catch Me If You Can). He is at once disarmingly cute, irresistibly charismatic…although he takes a few minutes to comfortably settle into the space.

 

The Powerhouse Theatre is a good deal bigger than the intimate surrounds of RACV Noosa Resort for example, which is where you’ll catch him next, in a Supper Club version of the show during Noosa Long Weekend Festival after a final performance this weekend in Melbourne.

 

There are some static moments, easily fixed by a deep breath, a bolt of confidence and consistent pace (the show picks up after the whole Paris tryst bit), and I feel like the more intimate venues, which allow a closer connection with the audience, will serve Mills well. It’s as if this show has come too soon and also, at precisely the right time for Mills. His gorgeous larrikin characters from musical theatre are somehow at odds with the Rob Mills he professes he wants to be seen as. So there’s clearly another show in this, but it will need to be revealed through the execution of this one.

 

 

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Penned by Mills and Natalie Garonzi, and directed by Tyran Parke, Mills and his hot band (hello, Kuki Tipoki!), led by MD Andrew Worboys, impress and delight the Queensland Cabaret Festival crowd.

 

A final cheeky appearance in the tight white pants of Fiyero seals the deal, in case we weren’t already, er, enamoured. The audacity and cheek of this increasingly confident performer even wins over sceptical Sam, who’s relinquished his +1 role many times, missing some previous performances about which Poppy and I have raved. After the show too, handing out “Surprisingly Good” buttons and posing for selfies by the bar, Mills proves he has the goods to stay at the top of the entertainment tree. So I think it’s time we dropped the “surprisingly good” and acknowledged that Rob Mills is sensational! I’ll look forward to seeing this show again, and whatever it is that must come after it.

 

 

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15
Jun
15

Storm Large – Taken By Storm

 

Taken By Storm

Brisbane Powerhouse & Queensland Cabaret Festival

in association with Adelaide Festival Centre

Powerhouse Theatre

Sunday June 14 2015

 

 Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

WHEN I GROW UP I WANT TO BE STORM LARGE.

 

 

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Storm Large is THE most incredible, powerful, most compelling cabaret performer you may never have known about. Well, perhaps you knew about her long before I did, in which case, why didn’t you say something?

 

A fitting fuck-yeah finish to our 2015 Queensland Cabaret Festival experience, Storm Large and her super slick band, Le Bonheur, performed a string of unique versions of songs by Cole Porter, Lou Reed, Tom Waits and Randy Newman, as well as original songs (Angels in Gas Stations, anyone?). IT’S ALL ABOUT LOVE. It was a set list that made me wonder all over again, where has this woman been all my life?! Well, she’s been singing in clubs since the 90s and attracted some attention in Portland (that’s right, in Portland), co-fronting the “little orchestra” – you may have heard of it – Pink Martini. In real life she’s been through hell and it’s ALL MADE HER WHO SHE IS TODAY – an Amazonian dark angel superwoman singer, author, actor, speaker, playwright and cabaret star of strength, sass, sex appeal and powerful vocal and emotional all-in-take-no-prisoners-never-leave-an-audience-member-behind performances. I do wish I’d had her to help me get through my thirties.

 

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Storm Large sings the truth and waxes lyrical about all sorts of subjects in between; her witty patter the relaxed, well-practiced-impromptu, political, crowd control stuff of a consummate cabaret star. Her easy connection with the audience (she knows we’re hungry for connection) means she takes us in the palm of her hand and tosses us from one song to the next and in and out of torrid emotions with the precision of the bouncy ball under a lyric. That’s not to say there’s no pause for reflection. She’s in no hurry. She can basically do whatever the hell she likes because ASTONISHING SUPERIOR BEING. She’s assertive, aggressive even, and yet she coaxes us too, whispering secrets that are clearly intended for each and every one of us.

 

A rock star storyteller nymph with powerhouse vocals and an epic personality to perfectly fill the space, I LOVE HER. I LOVE HER ORGASMIC CHANTEUSE ROCK DREAM RENDITION OF I’VE GOT YOU UNDER MY SKIN. CHECK IT. REPEAT. REPEAT. REPEAT. And try to tell me your day your life is not 100% better now.

 

 

 

In complete contrast, the wickedly funny, toe-tapping original number, 8 Miles Wide (“that’s about 13.7km in Australian”) has us all singing along if we’re not laughing out loud, desperately gasping for breath. #pussysoundsbetter

 

 

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Deeply satisfying original musical arrangements and Le Bonheur help this woman to soar, sure (another highlight is Hopelessly Devoted to You. Holy hilarious hard-hitting dominatrix stalker death metal torch song, Batman!), but it’s her command of the stage, clad in over-the-knee boots and fitted LBD, and her tone and vocal control that’s floored me. Ethereal Katie Noonan-ish top notes make way for devilish growls, just in case you mistook her for the angel she sounded like in the moment before a dark flash of smouldering wise woman wicked lightning.

 

 

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If every aspiring performer could drink in a whole night of Storm Large every now and then, perhaps we’d see a real resurgence in the genre, rather than the current everyone’s-got-a-story-to-tell trend. Because she gets everything there is to get about seducing an audience and manipulating us through one of the best one-night-stands of our lives.

 

Let’s face it. We’ve been taken by Storm. She’s the slickest, smartest, sexiest performer of the Queensland Cabaret Festival cabaret scene. Let’s have more of this glorious storm, pretty, pretty, pretty please.

 

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11
Jun
15

Best of Queensland Cabaret Festival!

Best of Queensland Cabaret Festival!

 

 

In here, life is beautiful!

 

 

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Last night Queensland Cabaret Festival kicked off with Voices of Vice, a one-off cabaret/concert bringing together some of the best local talent ahead of most of the visiting artists arriving from interstate and overseas.

 

Unfortunately, this meant a clash with one of the Festival highlights, Painted From Memory: The Music of Bacharach and Costello starring Michael Falzon and Bobby Fox with special guest star Luke Kennedy. If you saw it, let me know what you thought! I was sorry to miss it because these guys are CLASS.

 

Shows will clash. This is a standard Festival dilemma.

If only we could be in several different places at once.

 

Voices of Vice brought us songs of dissipation, debauchery, wickedness, corruption and all manner of sin, with highlights from Lizzie Moore, Melissa Western, Tyrone Noonan and Sandro Colarelli singing a song of Satan, written for him by The Good Ship. Hosted by Colarelli, Greg Bird (I loved his drunk piano number) and Alison St Ledger, the schtick lacked punchlines and pace (I find the pace lags whenever St Ledger takes the mic but boy, can she sing!), but the artists had a ball and the audience got a “taste” of what’s to come over the next few days and nights.

 

Make sure you plan ahead and get to the venue in time to find a park and get to Bar Alto at Brisbane Powerhouse or Russell Street Wine Bar at QPAC for a bite to eat and a chance to purchase your drinks because you can take drinks into the shows. Because CABARET.

 

HOT TIP: If your tickets are for the cabaret seating in the Powerhouse Theatre BUY A BOTTLE because punters getting up in the middle of a sultry torch song to get more alcohol and then juggle several glasses and said bottle on the way back to their seats are REALLY ANNOYING TO THE ARTISTS AND THE OTHER PUNTERS. YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE.

 

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#openingnightstyle Camilla & Sachi shoes (Metalicus under because WINTER)

 

TONIGHT

 

Choose from Tyrone Noonan’s Vegas! Standards Reborn, Mary Wilson: Up Close, Bendigo to Broadway: Bradley McCaw or Dash Kruck in I Might Take My Shirt Off. I loved Kruck’s show when we saw it earlier this year at Melt Festival.

 

 

 

 

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FRIDAY

 

You might like Vaudevillian ne’er-do-wells Dirty Sexy Politics (Tom Albert and Samuel Valentine), who are seizing government the only way they know how: with sex, revenge and unbridled chaos. Or you might feel like an hour of stirring, high-class entertainment with two of Queensland’s best loved artists as Annie Lee (with accompanist, Sallie Campbell) shares her most treasured songs and stories of a life in cabaret. Or you could join Geraldine Turner for an evening of songs from her celebrated career, peppered with show business anecdotes and stories.

 

OR you might be in the mood for a bit of jazz flute and double entendre from the surprise of the opening night show and (wait and see) the surprise hit of this festival, the nu-folk comedy duo, Warmwaters. The creation of Bridget Boyle and David Megarrity (with a cheeky look in from Lewis Jones – what a great team that makes), these two would probably feel more at home at Woodford Folk Festival, however; having accepted the invitation to appear at “Voices of Nice” they took everything in their stride and stole the show. It’s a parody of all things folk, complete with jazz flute and clever audience interaction. If you haven’t booked to experience Warmwaters you’re missing out! Image by Grant Heaton. BOOK HERE

 

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I loved Lizzie Moore (we saw her last as the other, other sister of Kylie Minogue). Moore oozes old-school cabaret sass-in-a-hat and worked the audience seated at tables until some of them weren’t sure where to look! Moore’s show, Cool Britannia, has been relocated from the Visy Theatre to the Powerhouse Theatre, allowing MORE OF YOU TO SEE IT! It’s a swinging sixties pop mod party that you won’t want to miss. Illustration by Sean Dowling. BOOK HERE

 

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Cool Britannia is the sound of those times and you’ll hear Moore bring to life hits by 60s British legends Petula Clark, Lulu and Dusty Springfield. The show also follows the sound to today, with songs from the latest wave of talent inspired by the Swinging 60s including Amy Winehouse, Duffy and Adele. Illustration by Sean Dowling.

 

Saturday

 

After a sold-out season at Queensland Cabaret Festival 2014, Michael Griffiths is back to dish the dirt and explain why he hasn’t grown up yet. Adolescent features tunes from musicals Jersey Boys and Priscilla: Queen of the Desert as well as 1980s classics by Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet, A-ha and Culture Club. BOOK HERE

 

From the 80s with Griffiths and into the 90s with Tom Sharah, who’ll take you on a ride through the decade that created him. I LOVE THESE GUYS.

 

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Be swept away by sultry songbirds Baby et Lulu – Abby Dobson (Leonardo’s Bride) and Lara Goodridge (FourPlay) – and their prodigious band (Mark Harrison on bass, Ross Harrington on saxophone, Julian Curwin on guitar and Marcello Maio on accordion) in a celebration of la vie française. BOOK HERE

 

Sunday (this is actually my schedule on Sunday)

 

3:30pm

Rob Mills Is…Surprisingly Good (or not so surprisingly if you’ve been following his career from screen to stage, nevertheless he says this show was inspired by the surprise of his critics). Join Rob for an evening of hilarious behind- the-scenes anecdotes, an eclectic array of show tunes and hits from Taylor Swift, Gavin DeGraw, Coldplay and Millsy himself. Here’s a fresh reminder that Rob Mills is actually an acclaimed musician and performer. BOOK HERE

 

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4:30pm & 6:30pm

Melissa Western’s Oh Lady Be Good is back in Brisbane after a successful UK tour AND due to demand the Festival has had to add a show, which means – you guessed it – MORE OF YOU GET TO MEET MELISSA WESTERN. Image by Simon Woods. BOOK HERE

 

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5pm

Fresh from Adelaide Fringe Festival, Only the Good Die Young features Queensland’s winner of the International Cabaret Contest, Jessica Papst, and a knock-out three-piece band ready to tackle RnB, blues, funk and rock. Directed by Cienda McNamara. Image by Joel Devereux. BOOK HERE

 

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8pm

Rock meets cabaret when international sensation Storm Large takes the stage. Direct from the US, Storm Large is best-known for her appearance on Rock Star: Supernova and is one of the compelling front-women for iconic band Pink Martini. Join her for an evening of tortured and titillating love songs; beautiful, familiar, yet twisted…much like Storm herself. Storm is joined by band Le Bonheur. Image by Laura Domela. BOOK HERE

 

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8pm

If you’re not at Storm Large you should probs be on the Turbine Platform to see Blur: The Songs of Ellen Reed. Reed is one of Brisbane’s rising stars with her incomparable voice and her ability to perform gracefully under pressure. She won Nova FM’s national extreme karaoke competition by belting out Lady Gaga’s “Born this Way” whilst covered in snakes and spiders inside a coffin. In BLUR Reed takes the stage to perform original tracks from her debut album, inspired by Queen, Fleetwood Mac and Frank Ocean, as well as insightful covers of classic pop, RnB and blues. Don’t miss this introduction to one of Australia’s newest chanteuses. Image by Joel Devereux. BOOK HERE

 

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That’s it, there you have it, my hot tips for the Queensland Cabaret Festival & Cabaret at the Cremorne in 2015.

 

 

Let us know where you are and what you’re loving via Instagram, Twitter and Facebook!

 

 

Hashtag #queenslandcabaret #qldcabaret #xsentertainment and tag @queenslandcabaret & @xsentertainment

 

 

10
Jun
15

Queensland Cabaret Festival opens tonight!

 

We’re sending the lucky winners of our double passes to ABSINTHE tonight!

Have fun, Chris, Tara and Gail!

 

Meanwhile, in New Farm…

 

 

Queensland Cabaret Festival opens at Brisbane Powerhouse TONIGHT!

 

 

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Tonight’s Voices of Vice lineup features a mouth-watering feast of festival performers and local legends including Bethan Ellsmore, Dirty Sexy Politics, Cienda McNamara, Tyrone Noonan, Alison St Ledger, Lizzie Moore, Sandro Colarelli, Greg Bird, Rebecca Grennan, David Megarrity and Bridget Boyle.

 

 

Feel free to flaunt your bad habits, perversions, and licentiousness in our den of iniquity where too much is never enough. Indulge in this celebration of tantalising transgressions, which are guaranteed to be delightful, delicious and a little bit wrong.

 

 

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In the immortal words of Tom Waits, “There ain’t no Devil, there’s just God when he’s drunk” so leave your better angels at the door – we won’t tell if you won’t!

 

 

 

 

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