Posts Tagged ‘statespeare

18
Oct
13

Statespeare

 

Statespeare

Shake & Stir Theatre Co and Brisbane Powerhouse

Brisbane Powerhouse

16 October – 17 October 2013

 

Reviewed by Meredith McLean

 

Does Shakespeare really sucketh so much?

 

Is Shakespeare still relevant? It’s the first rehearsal for the year 12’s Performance Task and Lachlan and Nerys know that with their knowledge of The Bard they cannot fail. Their allocated group members Jay and Rob don’t know the difference between Shakespeare and Schwarzenegger.

 

As this mismatched foursome battle it out on the drama room floor they surprise and shock themselves as they gain a greater understanding of Shakespeare’s most famous plays including Macbeth, Romeo & Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Titus Andronicus, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello,The Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet.

 

STATESPEARE is part of the 2013 Inaugural QLD Youth Shakespeare Festival. The Festival gives high school students the chance to compete against other talented Shakespeare fans for the chance to be part of a live Shakespeare stage show. The general public is encouraged to come along to the finals and see the students competing for this exciting opportunity.

 

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Tomorrow (Saturday) is the final day of the QLD Youth Shakespeare Festival! It’s competition day! Get there is you can!

Sat / Competition Sessions 1–4

Session 1 / Duologues 9am
Session 2 / Dance, Music, Photography & Design 11am
Session 3 / Scene Part 1 1pm
Session 4 / Scene Part 2 3pm

 

(each session runs for 90 mins)

 

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At first I balked at the plot of this show. The blurb claimed to keep Shakespeare relevant to adolescents and more specifically, Year 12 students. That in itself is fantastic but what about the audience that isn’t a year 12 student stressing about their O.P.? Is the show still relevant for them? Fortunately, I can say that it is.

 

Whether you’re a student, a drama teacher or a general theatregoer, the quality of Statespeare is remarkable.

 

The performers; Ross Balbuziente, Judy Hainsworth, Nelle Lee & Nick Skubij were all fantastic in their own roles. These four were the original cast. They each seemed made for the part.

 

But credit should go to the two writers of this production too. Nelle Lee, current artistic director of Shake and Stir Theatre Co. originally brought this script to life in 2009. It’s a refreshing take on the “school setting” you might find in a lot of theatre.

 

But she must thank her co-writer as well. He’s been around for a while now. Most people are aware of his work these days. He had biting wit and a great sense of iambic pentameter. Yes, I’m talking about Nelle’s friend William Shakespeare.

 

You don’t need to be a Shakespeare buff to enjoy the show. Nelle Lee and the team select all the best scenes for you, and demonstrate them in humourous and chilling ways.

 

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What I loved about this production is that they actually explain some of the dialogue and scenes in an entertaining way. No one will admit they had no idea what Demetrius in Midsummer’s Night Dream for example might be talking about, but then we don’t have to, after the cast comically demonstrate what’s going on in a modern setting.

 

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This show proves that Shakespeare is relevant for today’s students, and anyone who cares to enjoy a good show. If this were a Senior Drama Performance Task it would easily receive an A+.

 

25
Aug
12

1984

shake & stir 1984

1984

shake & stir theatre co.

QPAC Cremorne 

August 16 – September 1 2012

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU

 

And by Big Brother, of course I mean George Orwell’s and not Network Ten’s. Written in 1948, Orwell’s prophetic horror story of a state’s absolute power over the individual, in the current political climate, feels more relevant than ever.

I missed shake & stir’s production of the multi-Matilda Award winning Animal Farm last year. There have been many times since then that I’ve thought to myself, “Self, you really should have seen Animal Farm last year.” Now, after experiencing their faithful adaptation of Orwell’s 1984 (like Animal Farm, it’s the first theatrical adaptation of the novel in this country), I can honestly say I intend never to miss another main stage show from shake and stir.

This is a relatively young company, as far as main stage experience goes. Education Queensland accredited, they are more often seen in our schools. (Well, in those schools smart enough to book them well in advance). Their current touring show, Statespeare (“studying Shakespeare suckeths”), has been nominated for a coveted Helpmann Award. Not only that, but through their connections with students and teachers along the way, I ‘reckon shake & stir theatre co. receives more feedback via social media than just about any other Brisbane-based theatre company. The larger companies can learn from these young guns, a thing or two about the power of Instagram! I expect to see them on Pinterest next! With their increasing presence across the state and online, and with this powerful production, impressively staged in QPAC’s most intimate space, the Cremorne Theatre, shake & stir have become the company to watch.

Under Michael Futcher’s intelligent and daring direction, this show is flawless. Futcher has missed none of the powerful motifs from the original, horrifying novel, beautifully translating to the stage, the fear of rising power that, at the time, Orwell sought to warn readers about (he feared the lengths that Spanish and Russian communist governments were prepared to go to, in order to gain control of their citizens would catch on in the West). We feel the threat of oppression and absolute control by a totalitarian government that monitors its citizens 24/7. In Oceania, even thoughts can be crimes.

As we enter the theatre under a couple of rather intimidating searchlights and sit down before an immense wall of television screens sporting the eyes of Big Brother, we sense that all is not well. Understatement of the year? Perhaps. There is a distinct air of foreboding. The impressive digital display is built into a brilliant bomb-stricken set, which is full of surprises, revealing secret spaces and allowing easy access to props as well as providing gasp-worthy changes of scene as the plot rushes along and suddenly takes a turn into a well-balanced blissful state. Josh McIntosh has designed the ideal, austere interior, incorporating optikal bloc’s technology. I loved optikal bloc’s input into Anna McGahan’s He’s Seeing Other People Now and this effort too is impressive. The pre-recorded footage would mean little however, without the physicality and the prowess of the actors on stage. Particularly effective are the opening couple of minutes, the disturbing “two minutes of hate”, which had – believe it or not – a stronger impact on stage in 2012 than on screen in the 1984 released film.

As the long-suffering Winston Smith, Bryan Probets is outstanding, delivering his best work when he is silent on stage and his gaunt, pre-filmed face utters his every thought on screen. (It’s fascinating to see an audience struggle, not knowing which face to watch!). It’s a truly cinematic effect and testament to shake & stir’s commitment to establishing authentic connections with their audiences and challenging the forms and styles of traditional theatre making. As Smith takes step after tentative step towards certain doom (taking his lover, Julia, with him), “We watch on in enraptured horror, but…like Winston, manage to hold on to hope.” The hope is fleeting. The interrogation sequences within Room 101 are completely terrifying, the stuff of nightmares, which is of course the point and the conclusion, unhappily, is inevitable. I defy you to keep from squirming and shifting uncomfortably throughout. I guess the overriding hope is that it will never come to this outside of a book or a proscenium arch.

Boasting an enviable collective skill set, this ensemble is superb. Hugh Parker, Ross Balbuziente, Nelle Lee and Nick Skubij join Probets in what must be 2012’s most ambitious bit of storytelling (and arguably, the best told). Josh McIntosh (Designer), Jason Glenwright (Lighting Designer), Guy Webster (Composer/Sound Designer), optikal bloc (Media Producers) and Ben Shaw (Stage Manager) complete the formidable creative team that will, I suspect, take home another couple of Matildas this year for their fearless and flawless production of 1984. Bravo!

1984