Posts Tagged ‘roald dahl

05
Dec
16

Matilda the Musical

Matilda the Musical

Royal Shakespeare Company

QPAC Lyric Theatre

December 1 2016 – January 8 2017

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

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Matilda the Musical is hands down the best made and the best promoted show we’ve seen in this country. Not many productions live up to the hype preceding them but this one exceeds expectations. The elements combine in a perfect alchemy of joy, morality, imagination and witty, wicked humour, delighting kids, and daring adults to look around, pay attention to the children and begin to listen again to their own inner child.

Roald Dahl’s Matilda is the extraordinary little girl who, armed with a vivid imagination and a sharp mind, dares to take a stand and change her own destiny.

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Queensland’s Matildas are Izellah Connelly, Annabella Cowley, Venice Harris and Eva Murawski.

On opening night we saw Venice Harris, and as the rockstar chocolate-cake-eating Bruce, Exodus Lale, both superb. We will have to return a little later in the season to see our Eva perform! Last night she was on standby and she was able to appear on stage for a very special curtain call with the standby cast, and composer and lyricist, Tim Minchin.

We rarely see a genuinely rapturous, heartfelt standing ovation from an actual full house at QPAC.

(Don’t believe every accolade you see on social media. I’m so often surprised/bemused to see claims of a standing ovation when only a smattering of the audience is on its feet!), but the opening night Matilda audience was as excited and appreciative and awestruck as you’ll ever get at the end of a show. 

It’s no secret that opening nights are a special kind of magic but Matilda the Musical is a show with a buzz that makes you feel like every night is opening night. If there’s a person in the world who hasn’t enjoyed it, I’d like to meet them and ask, “WHAT’S YOUR DAMAGE?” There’s nothing to dislike here (except Miss Trunchbull and the Wormwoods and we’re supposed to loathe them). Matilda the Musical is an uplifting, life affirming, incredibly moving experience, and the cast of children a dynamic new breed of Australian talent. (Minchin has said the girls who play the Brisbane Matildas are four of the best, in this extremely demanding role, in the world. High praise indeed!). We recognise them by their tremendous hearts and rich, clipped voices, their explosive energy and their neatly contained egos. There are adults in the industry who can learn from these hard working and humble kids. (Those adults are not in this show!). And the synergy between adult and child performers makes this show extra special. The ensemble’s opening number, the fast-paced, bright and brilliant, memorably cheeky Miracle, followed by Matilda’s Naughty, and the School Song, choreographed and executed with military precision, testament to the extraordinary talent on stage and off.

There are also a number of must-be-something-in-my-eye moments.

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One of these moments is the beautifully bittersweet When I Grow Up. This is a smiling-while-tears-are-running-shamelessly-down-cheeks scene, reminiscent of Mary Poppins’ Let’s Go Fly a Kite. The use of a slippery slide and timber seated swings hanging from the gods creates a child-sized whimsical world of wide-eyed possibility. I want a swing hanging from the gods in my backyard! When the “big kids” fly out over the audience we gasp in surprise and delight and abandon – even those of us who have seen it before – and our hearts fill to bursting.

It’s not often that a production succeeds in pouring pure glee over an entire audience. 

A fully engaged little kid sitting next to me, so smart, asks his mama if they are sad because they don’t want to grow up. The kid is no older than four or five. Other innocent comments throughout the evening earn smiling, murmured responses from a lovely older gentleman in front and giggles from the rest of us. There’s a little bit of healthy fear happening too. True to the original story, there are some quite frightening moments in the show, just as there are in our dreams and ordinary lives, and the mother does her best to quietly comfort her child. I know parents sometimes avoid taking kids to the theatre because they know it will be their kid to shout out something in the middle of a show. They think this will annoy the other punters and leave themselves embarrassed and apologetic so they decide to give it a miss until the kids are older, and they and the child miss out on an awesome experience and lifelong memories. If you’re a parent wondering whether or not you should take the kids to the show, STOP WONDERING, BOOK THE TICKETS AND TAKE THE KIDS TO THE SHOW.

If the teens and the spouse are slightly wary, they should know Matilda the Musical is also, obviously and subversively, a very grown up show. If nothing else, tell them to hang in there until the final number, the epic kid rock anthem, Revolting Children, which is a showstopper they’ll be singing (and stomping!) for you for days, even weeks. Probably for the next six weeks…of school holidays…lucky you.

The burning woman, hurling through the air with dynamite in her hair, flying over sharks and spiky objects, caught by the man locked in the cage…

The Acrobat and the Escapologist, the story-within-the-story, which has been somehow magically more fully woven through the production since last seen, and which Matilda tells to Mrs Phelps (the fabulous Cle Morgan, a delicious performer of exquisite expression and passion; she shines in this underwritten role). You’ll remember it doesn’t appear in Roald Dahl’s book. The dramatisation of – spoiler alert – Mrs Honey’s parents’ romance, is a neat theatrical device to move us into another realm of storytelling, the segments perfectly placed throughout the show now to allow us to wander through Matilda’s imagination. Her voracious reading and imagining is her escape from a despicable family and horrible home life (loud, brassy, not-real-classy caricatures of the worst possible parents, in Daniel Frederickson & Nadia Komazec in Marika Aubrey’s absence).

There are so many dark themes and dastardly deeds detectable in life, which children need to be able to process just as grown ups do. Roald Dahl knew this, and Minchin and Dennis Kelly make a considered art of serving it straight up, without apology.

Elise McCann is a stronger, more focused and better settled Miss Honey than when we saw her early on in the Sydney season, her rendition of My House poignantly, perfectly delivered, the vocal tone just divine. And the incomparable James Millar, as the formidable Miss Trunchbull, takes the cake (and makes poor Bruce eat it!). Millar’s hilarious, highly physical performance is another highlight. His performance is so polished and so perfectly ridiculous and reasonable at the same time that you might have a hard time now, as I do, listening to the original Trunchbull, the much-loved Brit, Bertie Carvel. Sorry, Bertie.

Can we have an original Australian Cast recording please and thank you. 

Hugh Vanstone’s lighting and Rob Howell’s costume and set design transfer spectacularly well to the Lyric Theatre and MD Peter Rutherford’s orchestra is spot on. The only superfluous number for me is Mr Wormwood’s Telly, but others love it. 

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Matilda the Musical lifts our spirits and raises the musical theatre bar. It’s a show that proves the book, the film and the real life lens we look through every day can be improved upon. YES. The way we view the world is a choice we make every day. And Matilda reminds us that putting things right and standing up for ourselves and for others is easier than we’ve been led to believe.  

Don’t even think for a second you can miss it. There is no gift more magical or inspirational you can give yourself and those you love than Matilda the Musical

 

Brisbane Opening Night Company:

Matilda – Venice Harris
Bruce – Exodus Lale
Alice – Tahlae Colson
Amanda – Isla White
Hortensia – Madison Randl
Lavender – Charlotte Smith
Eric – Elias Geffen
Nigel – Alfie Jamieson
Tommy – Jake Binns
Adult Cast as follows:
Miss Trunchbull – James Millar
Mrs Wormwood – Nadia Komazec
Mr Wormwood – Daniel Frederiksen
Miss Honey – Elise McCann
Mrs Phelps – Cle Morgan
Ensemble – Stephen Anderson, Reece Budin, Travis Khan, Daniel Raso, Rachel Cole, James Bryers, Leah Lim, Adam Noviello, Patrick Whitbread
Swings – Cristina D’Agostino, Matt Douglass, Hannah Stanton, Clay Roberts, Danielle Cook

 

 

 

 

 

15
Jan
16

George’s Marvellous Medicine

 

George’s Marvellous Medicine

shake & stir theatre co.

QPAC & shake & stir

QPAC Cremorne

January 6 – 23 2015

Reviewed by Poppy Eponine

Don’t get up to mischief!

George’s Marvellous Medicine is so funny, it’s the funniest show these school holidays, and I’m lucky enough to have seen them all. Sometimes it was scary but it was always going to be a happy ending, although NOT for Grandma. I won’t tell you what happens to her…

Adapted by shake & stir, it’s like the book by Roald Dahl but it’s shaken and stirred, and fun for all ages, including grandmas and grandpas. Even grandmas and grandpas know the story. Don’t they?

On a good day, George can’t stand his Grandma. She complains all the time, she’s mean and she smells funny. On this particular day, Grandma is much more annoying than usual and George has had enough. “George – make me a cup of tea! George – rub my feet! George – stop growing!” Ugh. Wanting to teach her a lesson and to put an end to her constant nagging, George concocts a special medicine, greater than any medicine in the history of medicines. What he doesn’t expect is that this medicine may actually work – just not in the way he thinks it will…

You must have the RIGHT amount of the RIGHT ingredients!

When they were putting in the ingredients Nugget the chicken pulls out a bottle of Dom Perignon and George’s mother exclaims, “Not that! That’s my special medicine!”. That made the audience laugh. My mum applauded.

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With all of those messy ingredients, the Stage Manager (Yanni Dubler) has a big job after each show, refilling bottles and pots and jars and resetting them on the stage with the exact same amount of stuff so the actors know they can make the medicine all over again for the next audience. The set is a clever combination of shelves and open doors and windows that are pushed from side to side and back and forth by the actors to create every setting in the show. They are pushed away to reveal Grandma sitting in her chair. She’s in the light of a spotlight so you literally cannot look at anything else. When the chair is turned around Grandma looks and sounds so scary. She is mean to George and sweet as pie when his parents are nearby. She fakes being grateful and treats George badly when they are not looking. She demands her medicine be ready at eleven o’clock so George has a time limit to make it. This builds tension and makes us expect that something bad will happen. Unless of course you’ve read the book, in which case you’ll know that everything will be fine…except for Grandma.

You can tell that the second and third time the medicine is made that it isn’t going to work out because they make it really obvious that something is left out. It’s very funny sometimes to expect things to go wrong. 

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Josh McIntosh and Jason Glenwright always design the set and lighting for shake & stir shows because they are an excellent team. Mum says the look and feel of each show is largely dependent on what they bring to the table. She loved their design for Dracula but I didn’t see it because it wasn’t for kids.

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I love all of the music and all of the effects that are so gorgeous, used sometimes more than once yet not used so many times that they become boring. This means Ross Balbuziente has done a good job directing. He has made it a fun and interesting show with lots of tricks and magic. We always notice if the actors are having fun because then we have fun too, and Ross has made sure everyone has a lot of fun.

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It is good casting, which is really important. Each actor makes their character seem real when really we know they are just the actors in a show. But thank goodness mean old Grandma isn’t real! Leon Cain is hilarious as Grandma. He has curlers in his real hair and his voice sounds like an old lady’s. And Tim Dashwood will be just as good in this role, just different. Nick Skubij is George, very naughty, and Johnny Balbuziente is a very funny chicken. He jumps around a lot and Mum says he is a welcome addition to the mainstage professional company. Nelle Lee is George’s gossipy mother and she wears a very cool, very funny cow hide skirt. It could be the latest and greatest fashion. Mum loves the phone calls she makes, her shoe scene and her love for her chicken. Bryan Probets is her husband, George’s dad, and he is very funny too. They are not really like the parents in the book but the mother is up to date wearing the latest and greatest everything and the father is even crazier than in the book. Mum has seen Bryan in a LOT of shows and he is ALWAYS good.

I love all of shake & stir’s kids’ productions and Mum loves all the adult shows. We are lucky to have shows for kids like this because sometimes companies from other countries make the shows and tour them and they’re not as funny or as entertaining as shake & stir’s shows. 

Our life is anything but normal, in fact it’s quite shaken and stirred! I see a LOT of shows but shake & stir’s shows are aways some of my favourite shows. They are always funny and entertaining. They always make me smile. The actors are excellent and the story on stage brings each book to life so even if you haven’t read George’s Marvellous Medicine you can enjoy the show. That’s IF you can get a ticket and if you can’t you know for next time to book your tickets as soon as possible or YOU WILL MISS OUT.

06
Jul
15

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts – perfect school holiday entertainment!

 

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts

shake & stir

Roundhouse Theatre

July 4 – 11 2015

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward 

 

It’s a rock concert, a Hip Hop film clip, a fairytale, and a favourite book brought to vivid life, all rolled into one and all PG-Rated. It’s the perfect solution for some school holiday fun that the whole family will enjoy, really. 

 

 

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More a reflection of my lack of conviction in a situation as a parent than any annoyance at the response of a volunteer at the venue, I found myself, in teacher tone, addressing an usher about a drink before taking our seats at The Roundhouse on Saturday. I’m accustomed to pouring wine from a glass into a plastic cup in order to take it into the theatre, but I was surprised to be told that Poppy would need to do the same for her drink, which was in a pop-top sealed plastic bottle. I almost laughed out loud. Seriously?! You want my jumping-up-and-down-excited nine-year-old to take her seat in the theatre with an open cup of diluted juice? (Don’t ask! We are having sugar talks at the moment). As Poppy dutifully uncapped the bottle and poured her juice-water into an enormous plastic party cup (she’s an excellent pourer and transferrer), I wondered what other mamas would do. I can think of a couple that would simply say, “No. No thanks, I think I know my child” and another couple who would actually laugh and say, “Are you joking? THINK about what you’ve just said!” And I wish I’d said something other than okay and put the bottle-with-a-lid-shut-tight in my bag because sure enough, right at the end of the show, Poppy accidentally kicked the cup, spilling the remaining slightly sticky contents over the floor beneath her seat. OH, OOPS, WHAT A SURPRISE (I said sarcastically, silently in my head).

 

As a fairly conscious parent and a first aider from way back, my immediate response is always to check for danger, assess any injuries and avoid further catastrophe while keeping anyone involved calm and quiet. There are times when Sam makes it clear that this is not the correct response, that it’s too calm and without consequence for the culprit (he is referring to our child). But more often than not, the consequence is in the disaster, and in this case, Poppy was embarrassed and upset because she knew I had felt the better option was to not do what the usher had told her to. Also, she slipped and fell against her seat BUT IT’S OKAY SHE’S OKAY.

 

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Why am I telling you this? Because going to see live theatre is about the whole experience, and often parents tell me it’s too hard to take their kids to see a show. If the venue makes it harder than parents already perceive the trip to be, who can say when they’ll be back?! Fortunately, nothing has ever deterred me from taking anyone to the theatre and Poppy is a resilient child, so despite her moment of mini-trauma (not only is she resilient but she’s also very dramatic. I don’t know where she gets it from), we agreed that Revolting Rhymes was the BEST EVER! AGAIN! Perfect school holiday entertainment for the whole family, nothing should keep you from enjoying this show.

 

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If you’ve been around for a while you’ll know how much I love shake & stir, one of the country’s most professional and engaging theatrical teams, with such broad appeal they can consistently sell out work that reinvigorates the likes of Roald Dahl, Shakespeare, George Orwell, Harper Lee, Emily Bronte and Bram Stoker (trust me – there’s no doubt Dracula will sell out!).

 

It seemed unlikely that shake & stir could make a slicker, funnier show than last year’s Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts but that’s exactly what they’ve done. Having had it on the road for some time (they just returned from a sell-out season in Hobart at the end of a national tour), the team has cranked up the pace and polished every aspect until this production sparkles even more brilliantly than before.

 

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With the A-Team of design teams on board (Josh McIntosh, Jason Glenwright & Guy Webster), this show was always going to look and sound fabulous. The colours and textures – rich, warm autumnal tones, tulle and brocade – are vaguely reminiscent of the curtains in Captain Von Trapp’s house, which Maria makes into play clothes for the children. Yes, I know those are greener, but don’t tell me you didn’t think of them too. The overall aesthetic is one of magical rainy day dress ups and cubby house construction using tablecloths and sheets and pillows for hosting soft toy high tea parties. Perfect!

 

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shake & stir think of everything.

 

The wonderfully talented, comical ensemble comprising Judy Hainsworth, Leon Cain, Nelle Lee & Nick Skubij strikes the right chord with an audience who are already vocally ready to participate, having sung at the top of their little voices before the show, “I GOT BILLS I GOTTA PAY!” (shake & stir always have the best pre-show soundtrack!).

 

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Thenadier style, the actors pop up from under trapdoors in the revolve – the only set piece, brilliantly designed and utilised – and each performer tells us, “You think you know this story… You don’t!” There are giggles and then shrieks of laughter, from kids and parents (and from Leigh Buchanan, next to me, and Billy Bouchier and Paul Dellit in front!), as small bold voices call out, “Yes we do! YES WEEEEE DOOOOOO!” The atmosphere is vibrant and silly and fun. It feels like so many children’s birthday parties when at any minute things could turn to utter chaos, but a pretty distraction or little bit of structure is re-introduced at precisely the right time in order to avert disaster.

 

Director, Ross Balbuziente, like the perfect host, cleverly manipulates every moment of Revolting Rhymes, from the grisly to the ridiculously funny.

 

With the opening sequence setting a cheeky tone and a cracking pace, we can’t wait to see what comes next…again!

 

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It was fun. It was hilarious. My favourite was Little Red. She was awesome. She was really funky, a tomboy instead of being a pretty little girly-girl. It was funny when she took the pistol out of her knickers. She was funny but you couldn’t trust her.

 

The porcupine one was funny and it was funny how she was so scared of the dentist, which was quite like real life because most people are actually scared of the dentist.

 

It was funny when the man dressed up as one of the ugly sisters. And Cinderella had to run home in her underwear and that’s just so different. In the Cinderella we are all used to her gown turns into rags so it’s much funnier to see her in her underwear.

 

And I loved the three bears, especially the mum because of her accent. This mum is my mum’s favourite character. She says Nelle is a scream. That’s something her mum, my Nanny, would say.

 

Mira said the crunching noises were a bit disconcerting…

 

It tells you more about the stories, like there is more to the stories, like the secrets of the stories.

 

It’s sometimes scary but not too scary.

 

It’s important that it looks good, that theatre looks good – the lights and the costumes are gorgeous, awesome – otherwise we’ll stop watching and just talk because we haven’t seen each other in such a long time.

 

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Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts is holiday money well spent, perfect entertainment for all ages. You don’t need to be a child or take a child to enjoy this one. You just need to stick to your guns if challenged by an usher over a drink! Must close Saturday July 11!

 

 

11
Jan
14

Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts

 

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts

La Boite and shake & stir

The Roundhouse

January 8 – 18 2014

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

This famous wicked little tale
Should never have been put on sale
It is a mystery to me
Why loving parents cannot see
That this is actually a book
About a brazen little crook…

 

You think you know this story… You don’t.

 

In a previous life, Jason Glenwright must have been a rock star because he sure knows how to light one. And if Josh McIntosh did not dress royalty at some stage I’ve got my readings wrong. Whether or not you’re any sort of theatrical aficionado, you’re likely to recognise the design work of both these gentlemen by now; it’s pretty distinctive and I’m not the only one to have raved about it in the past. Also, Guy Webster’s sound design, including perfectly timed sound effects that have the kids in fits of giggles, adds to the wonderful theatricality and simple joy of this production, obviously lovingly inspired by Roald Dahl’s witty words and Quentin Blake’s original delightful illustrations. Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts was always going to be a hit with the kids, but to win over the grown ups within the opening ten seconds using music, lighting and a revolving stage is quite a feat! If you’re a stranger to shake & stir’s shows, this one will be the first of many, I guarantee it, and if you miss it, you’ll be doing yourself and your kids a huge disservice. Why not book now and come back to read the rest?

 

It’s a rock concert, a Hip Hop film clip, a fairytale, and a favourite book brought to vivid life, all rolled into one and all PG-Rated. It’s the perfect solution for some school holiday fun that the whole family will enjoy, really.

 

And I mean THE WHOLE FAMILY. REALLY. These four performers are awesome, and the company already has a massive secondary school following so don’t think twice about booking the extra seats for the teens, they’ll love it! And Dads will surely remember fondly, their fave Revolting Rhymes, as well as (and I don’t mind being the one to point it out!), find themselves completely captivated by Nelle Lee, who is always absolutely gorgeous to watch.

 

You might recall last year’s co-pro between shake & stir and La Boite Theatre Company, the sell-out holiday hit Out Damn Snot!, and you might wonder what will come next, because this is a winning formula, and a winning partnership between two of Brisbane’s most progressive and most popular theatre companies. I love that this time slot each year, towards the end of our longest, hottest, sometimes most tedious school holiday run, can feature well-loved children’s stories turned upside down and inside out, challenging and entertaining all ages. Seeing the shake & stir show before school goes back is one tradition I’m more than happy to help establish.

 

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts. Image by Dylan Evans.

 

Despite a couple of gruesome moments, Poppy and the other opening night kids laughed along with their parents at shake & stir’s bold interpretations of Dahl’s updates to the classic fairytales. A self-sufficient, savvy Little Red Riding Hood whips a pistol from her knickers and shoots the wolf that gobbles up her grandmother, in order to make herself a beautiful fur cloak, and later…well, we won’t give that one away but if you love your accessories, you’ll love the haute couture reference. We also see a different side to Jack (of Beanstalk fame), and (naughty, nasty, selfish) Goldilocks. That conclusion is bit of a shocker, be warned, but we can’t help to feel that the “brazen little crook” deserves her untimely end! One of my favourite characters is Nelle Lee’s Mama Bear, of solid New York Jewish stock. But Poppy loved Little Red the most because she was different. “You wouldn’t like it if everyone was just the same as you,” she told me. “She was brave and spunky.” Wait. Does my daughter not consider herself to be brave and spunky? Oh, right. “In a different way. She has to survive in the woods, Mum.” This makes me picture my child having to survive in the woods, and in my vision she is something like Little Red and Laura Ingalls Wilder. Anyway, I equate this to Poppy having a Hunger Games type idol, which concerns me little since the best women in history have always been able to defend themselves, and this Little Red is so reminiscent of Sondheim’s Red Riding Hood in Into The Woods that we can’t help but adore her, admire her, and fear her just a little.

 

They are all absolutely sensational characterisations.

 

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts. Image by Dylan Evans.

 

We love the revolving stage, ideal for The Roundhouse space, although it’s not set completely in-the-round, it’s used effectively to hide and light and reveal performers and props; this is particularly evident in The Three Little Pigs. A single piece of fabric serves multiple purposes, and basic costume additions during the course of the show remind us that it doesn’t take much more than the imagination to conjure a story, but of course the technical and theatrical elements certainly help to make this a slick one. The pace is fast; the script, straight from “the world’s number one storyteller”, is funny and the performers engaging. They are Leon Cain, Judy Hainsworth, Nelle Lee and Nick Skubij, a tight, super talented ensemble guided by Director, Ross Balbuziente. We know from the very first moments that this is a clever crew, who get precisely what it is their audience wants; they are up for fun and games, and deliver with ease a multitude of clever and entertaining character voices, sharp moves (choreographed by Sally Hare), and retellings of our favourite Roald Dahl rhymes and stories. The 90 minutes fly by and Poppy whispers loudly to me, “Is that all? Oh.” She wishes there was more to come. And perhaps there will be.

 

When you love a show, do you let the company know?

 

If we keep up with shouting out loud about what’s great, venues and presenters know what they need to keep bringing back! You could email them, but why not leave a comment on their Facebook page or Instagram account? Tweet your 140-character review? The social media presence of both these companies, especially shake & stir’s online presence, is inspiring and heartening. This is a company who hears us and continues to create crowd pleasers without compromising their own artistic objectives. This means we are regularly treated to an incredible selection of top notch theatre in Brisbane, guaranteed quality, for artists and audiences alike. More of this, please shake & stir!

 

Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts. Image by Dylan Evans.

 

In Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes & Dirty Beasts there are some slightly gruesome life lessons and a heap of fun for everyone. It’s a gorgeous looking production, with not a dull moment, but if you hesitate for even a moment you WILL miss out! And that WOULD be criminal. Treat yourself and your kids to this production before the holidays are over and you have to return to the real world!

 

11
May
13

The BFG – Inside Out Theatre Company’s debut

The BFG

Inside Out Theatre Company

Lind Lane Theatre

9th -12th May 2013

 

Reviewed by Poppy Eponine

 

Today we went to see The BFG. It was raining and we made it in record time, to see the show that our friend Russell put on with kids outside of his school. (Well, some of them are probably from his school). Mum didn’t actually book online, which turned out to be a bad idea because they sold out the season and we had to wait and see if two people were not going to turn up. We were lucky that two people didn’t turn up, probably because of the rain, and we got to see it. It was amazing!

 

You should watch the show before you read the book but if you’ve read the book already the show is not scary because you know what’s going to happen. I read some of the book so I knew that it would be fun, funny and EXCITING to see live on stage! Mum says it’s important to tell you that the real story by Roald Dahl was ADAPTED for the stage by David Wood. So it’s not the WHOLE story by Roald Dahl but it IS his story and David Wood turned bits of it into a play.

 

Georgina Howarth & Giants The BFG

The BFG is not the only giant. There are bad giants too and the bad giants looked amazing with their spooky monster heads, blood on the tip of their teeth and painted costumes. They were fantastic costumes. Somebody must have put all their energy into making the beautiful costumes.

 

Those bad giants jumped around a lot and they bossed the Big Friendly Giant around. They shouted and they were like, “I’m the boss now!” There was a baby giant and his dad (not his real dad, just his show dad), and they were in orange. There was a green one and a pink one and a yellow one and a blue one. And a weird-looking camel lady, the queen of the Vikings, who was actually the Swedish queen. That was our friend Denise, who we saw before the show. They all had plenty of time to get ready.

 

I liked the Big Friendly Giant the most because he was so friendly to the kids. He was the one and only dream catcher giant. He felt a bit alone because he was different but he wasn’t sad about it. And he was the only giant with massive ears to hear lots of sounds to make sure he could keep hidden.

 

I also liked Sophie. Sophie was a little orphan. The Big Friendly Giant snatched her out with his great giant hands – he actually took Sophie out through the window – and now she will have to live with him forevermore. Sophie was the best main character as well as the Big Friendly Giant. They were the best actors and I completely know why they were chosen for those parts because they were so good. The Big Friendly Giant was exactly perfect just like in the book and he talked just like in the book. The actor got ALL of his words.

 

At the end the bad giants get captured and the Big Friendly Giant has to say goodbye. I got a bit emotional. I cried on Mum’s shoulder and I put my tears on Mum’s cheek as though she was crying too. But I was glad that everything turned out well for everybody. And everybody got to see the bad giants in the zoo.

 

Tim Gill The BFG

My favourite part of the story was when they go catching dreams and when they come back home they check what sort of dreams they’ve got and the third one is a bad dream so in the end they use the bad dream to give the bad giants nightmares. The golden dream is the best and the pink dream is a tiny bit like a nightmare but still good. And then it’s the green dream you don’t want in your head because it gives you nightmares. They used sparkling, glowing disco bracelets to show the dreams in jars. Before they put them in the jars, dancers were wearing them. There were dancers and narrators to help tell the story the whole time.

 

The lighting was terrific, they even got a special check to make sure they knew exactly when to do the lighting and nothing went wrong for the backstage people. Except for the projection, which was clever, but the Big Friendly Giant flicked on and off the screen when he was really behind the curtain. But it didn’t matter because the show must go on!

 

There were other clever things too, like a china doll for Sophie and puppets for the queen and her army men. They were funny and they kept laughing and talking in funny accents. The audience laughed and thought they were really funny.

 

The bad giants tried to eat all of Sophie’s friends but they escaped and they got tossed around but not eaten. And there were the funny fruits, snozzcumbers, that no one liked at all. But if you want to be as skinny as a line you had to eat them. But no person should be that skinny. Never, ever. Unless they are starving to death.

 

The BFG Inside Out Theatre Company

The BFG is the best show for kids I’ve seen on the Sunshine Coast and I hope Russell puts on more shows for kids because my mum and dad only do shows for grown ups. His shows are like the Harvest Rain shows for kids that we sometimes see in Brisbane, like James and the Giant Peach (Mum says it was adapted by David Wood too). Now we can see shows like that here on the Sunshine Coast!

 

Russell’s directing was excellent and he did an excellent job with all of the characters, and with so many kids involved. AND he told us he wants to start a school for kids who want to do shows. I think it’s an excellent idea because that’s what I do at BYTES but not all kids can do BYTES. If there was something like BYTES at Lind Lane Theatre lots of kids would want to do it and they would need to do more than six shows because they would sell out the season just like this one.

 

I will let you know what Russell and Judi and their Inside Out Theatre Company are up to next so you can get your mum to book online so you don’t miss out on a show!

 

P.S. This song wasn’t in the show but the scene is so funny with good sound effects so I wanted to put it up here anyway. It’s a little bit rude but it’s okay because it’s in the story so it’s in the context.

 

 

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Poppy Eponine is nearly seven and she knows what she’s talking about.