Posts Tagged ‘carol lloyd

21
Oct
15

Women In Voice 2015

 

Women In Voice 2015

Judith Wright Centre & WiV

Judith Wright Centre

October 15 – 24 2015

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

jan van de stool

 

Women In Voice (WiV), the fabulously fun and entertaining, long-running Brisbane institution returns to the Judy in its 23rd configuration.

Its successful formula this time features Emma Dean, Carol Lloyd, Yani, Alison St Ledger and Queenie van de Zandt in the guise of her alter ego, International Music Therapist, Jan van de Stool.

 

WiV_QueenieVanDeZandt.JPG

 

Van de Stool appeared with WiV in 2006 and it’s her hysterical patter as MC that elevates this show to the next level. Unlike the diehard WiV fans that don’t miss a show I’ve attended intermittently over the years, impressed with some performances and with others, not so much. It’s the first time I’ve seen Van de Zandt’s character away from YouTube and, along with a stellar sounding band and Emma Dean’s superb performance, Van de Zandt as Van de Stool is the highlight of the night. Only Carita Farrar Spencer (and probs Bob Downe) comes close to entertaining a crowd in a similar fashion, and it’s with Farrar Spencer that Van de Zandt hopes to take WiV to Melbourne.

 

But wait. Why not pair Women in Voice with Women of Letters? I KNOW. CAN YOU IMAGINE?!

 

WiV_Emma+Dean-KateDPhotography.jpg

 

Emma Dean opens the show with a suitably eclectic, precisely stitched together set, featuring superb arrangements by Stephen Russell (MD, piano & mandolin) of Tori Amos, Kate Bush, Fiona Apple and Bjork. She also sings (and drums with style) a fun, sassy song about a hot knife and pound of butter, which we first heard in Noosa when we hosted Dean and Francesca de Valence in an intimate “home” concert. What is that song called?

 

Recently returned from a stint in NYC, Dean’s unique voice and vibe are stronger than ever; she’s delicious enough to send a shiver down my spine on more than one occasion, and she’s a clear favourite with the audience on opening night.

 

WiV_CarolLloyd-DylanEvansPhotography.jpg

 

Carol Lloyd, Aussie rock legend, suited up and still in strong voice, appears to come with her league of loyal fans and with them she is a hit. For me, it’s the gentle acapella arrangement of Calling All Angels, shared by the women, which strikes the right chord and lifts this rock ballad to new heavenly heights.

 

WiV_Yani-DylanEvansPhotography.jpg

 

“World Music Mama” Yani and Alison St Ledger bring new stories to the stage their way. I’ve never enjoyed a St Ledger set so much – so much story – and Yani’s voice is pure and Woodford Folk Festival hungry (or perhaps I am! I think we’re all yearning for it…not long now!). It’s in these moments especially, looking around at an appreciative audience, that we can clearly see the success of the formula.

 

In each WiV production we enjoy such diverse talent and personal stories from some of the best artists around. It’s always a mixed bag so you can’t really ever lose, and if you take a few friends and book a cabaret table (the best way to enjoy an evening of cabaret, let’s face it!), you’ll have loads of fun during and lots more to discuss after the show.

 

This lineup won’t disappoint.

Go, book a table, take in a drink and enjoy.

 

WiV_AlisonStLedger-DylanEvansPhotography.jpg

 

 

 

07
Jan
14

It Takes Two, Baby! Carol Lloyd & Topology at Brisbane Powerhouse

 

 

Catch Carol Lloyd, Australia’s original Rock Chick, appearing with Sue Ray for one night only on Saturday January 11!

 

 

BPH_It_Takes_Two_5_2014-1180x663

 

Railroad Gin, The Carol Lloyd Band, featuring Australia’s Wild Woman of Rock / Sue Ray has been singing since she was about 4, with her dad, Owen Ray who had a band called The Countdowns since the 60’s. She is now based in Nashville and her latest album is called Red Roses.

 

In August, Lloyd spoke with Spencer Howson for 612 ABC Brisbane. Listen here or read the story below, by Emma Sykes and Spencer Howson.

 

The former lead singer of Railroad Gin – the Brisbane rock band which shot to fame in the mid-70s – says she received the terminal diagnosis of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in January 2013.

 

In August 2013 doctors gave Lloyd less than 12 months to live.

 

Speaking very matter-of-factly about the time she has left, Lloyd says she believes the treatment will “extend the time frame.”

 

“They’re saying months not years and I’m saying ‘hey this is the fight of my life and I’m not going to lose it’.”

 

At their peak Railroad Gin, led by Lloyd, regularly toured Australia, performing with Suzie Quatro, Billy Thorpe, Sherbet, Little River Band, Daddy Cool, Stevie Wright, Pink Zoot, Matt Taylor, Renee Geyer, Marcia Hines; they even toured the US with BB King.

 

Despite having her good and bad days battling the disease, Lloyd says she is continuing to sing, even performing in front of hundreds of friends and family at a recent gig in Brisbane in early August.

 

“It hasn’t got me to the point where I just can’t sing anymore,” she said. “While I can still do it, let’s do it.”

 

At the August gig, Carol and her life partner Annie held a commitment ceremony during the interval to the surprised of many in the audience.

 

“It was fabulous, we had a beautiful ceremony,” she said.

 

When asked about how she felt about any possible changes to the marriage act in the future, Lloyd says she’d do it all over again.

 

“If it happens in my lifetime I’ll be doing it again, absolutely.”

 

 

BPH_It_Takes_Two_7_2014-1180x663

 

 

With an all-star band, Carol Lloyd and Sue Ray present It Takes Two, Baby! – 90 minutes of rolled musical gold, with rare footage, backstage secrets and all their favourite songs from the 60’s/70’s!

 

From The Everly Brothers to Elvis’s Love Me Tender, the Righteous Brothers’ You’ve Lost that Lovin’ Feelin to Jagger and Bowie’s Dancing in the Streets, there will be Motown sounds and grooves laid down from hit songs of their own!

 

With special guests Christa Powell and John Babbage from Topology, It Takes Two, Baby! celebrates the days when ‘fros were big – and ballads even bigger!