Posts Tagged ‘barbara lowing

07
Sep
18

Rovers

 

Rovers

Belloo Creative

Maleny Community Centre

Sunday August 26 2018

 

Next:

Brisbane Festival

Theatre Republic

September 11 – 15 2018

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

RECOMMENDED FOR

 

STRONG FEMALE LEAD

 

BECAUSE YOU WATCHED

 

How do you select what to watch? Without the Netflix prompts, do you consider the poster and PR for a live show, or the recommendation in print or online media, word of mouth or social media whispers? Do you follow the performers, the directors, the production company? What about all of the above? Belloo Creative’s Rovers featuring Roxanne McDonald and Barbara Lowing, written by Katherine Lyall-Watson and directed by Caroline Dunphy, looks to be one of the highlights of Brisbane Festival’s Theatre Republic this year. But don’t take my word for it, see for yourself. I saw it in its simplest form first, on a Sunday afternoon in Maleny, an inspired inclusion in Maleny Winter Theatre Festival within Horizon Festival.

 

 

Australia breeds its women tough – and adventurous.

 

What an absolute joy it is to see these theatre doyennes, Roxanne McDonald and Barbara Lowing, together again on stage after more than twenty years apart. Accomplished performers, completely at ease with each other and with their audience, McDonald and Lowing offer in Rovers a performance masterclass (a life masterclass, really) for re-emerged and submerged artists everywhere, and for Australians of all ages. 

 

 

You don’t need to be in the biz to appreciate that this all-female company holds a firm place now in the Australian theatrical ecosystem. Having been brought on board by Queensland Theatre as Resident Company for 2019 and with a string of award winning original productions behind them, including Sand, Hanako and Motherland, Belloo is one of our boldest, bravest, most original and transparent mouthpieces. 

 

The impetus for the creation of this rollicking storytelling adventure, the reunion on stage of two top performers, means much merriment of the meta variety as we’re let in on a few of the secrets of theatrical careers that have spanned decades. A couple of lifetimes of uncertainty in the arts, and self-realisation and determination applied in equal measure to artistic and everyday pursuits blur with the groundbreaking adventures of elders: the older and maybe wiser, maybe wilder – but not, not really, in so many ways – trailblazing women. Combining intriguing details and vivid characters creates a number of crossovers, in time and context, in a sophisticated storytelling style continually being honed by writer, Katherine Lyall-Watson (Sand, Hanako, Motherland).

 

 

 

Fascinating and often very funny outback tales, neatly shared using minimalist, multipurpose set pieces and props, are woven between real life fourth-wall-torn-down moments, challenging our expectations of the contemporary live theatrical experience, without any AV or…oh, wait a minute. There’s a haunting segment involving AV that will leave you either wanting more of it, or none of it. I’m undecided about it. I forgot to ask the girls about it. I need to see it again during Brisbane Festival with all the bells and whistles. Other than this short, dark break in the regular programming, Dunphy resists creating superfluous imagery, allowing in the most economical way the stories and connections – to the land and to spirit, each woman to the other and each to herself – to become clear through the simplest narrative device, the women switching between actor-characters and multiple story characters. With a hat or a scarf or a flourish they become the women who have inspired them, whose memories have sustained them in difficult times and driven them to succeed in so many areas in life. A series of engaging and entertaining vignettes is sensitively woven together by the wondering and whimsy of McDonald and Lowing in real life, sort of, under the playfully presented premise of our attendance at a wake, which is not a sad affair you understand, but a celebration.

 

 

 

It all seems rather relaxed and raw, and what a pleasure that is to be a part of! The form is so intimate, the theatrical tone swinging between a kind of nonchalance and rather grand, unapologetically indulgent drama. We feel embraced by the women, caught up in a big warm hug, gently and firmly reminding us that we have our bloodlines and our stories too, and don’t forget them! And don’t forget to tell them. 

 

Rovers is a sincere and completely charming, beautifully measured look at the strength and spirit of women trailblazers, a celebration of the sisterhood in its truest sense, pre-memes and inspirational quotes. At the same time, this is a show that manages to hold space for those we’ve lost and also, those parts of ourselves that we may have lost touch with from time to time. In the pauses there’s a sense of stretched time and open space, the quiet vastness of this country…of our hearts…and then it’s gone. The ephemeral nature of theatre. 

 

The stories that are meant for us somehow find us, don’t they? And the tales we’re meant to tell eventually find their way to the surface to be shared. In this is the essence of Rovers, a thoughtfully curated collection of the stories these women were always meant to share. Universal personal stories of strength, sadness, resilience, celebration, fear, grief, love, loss, legacy, memory and mad MacGyver survival skills… and always, the sweetest sense of stopping and breathing – really stopping and breathing – to recognise and appreciate everything we have to gain by sharing our experiences, and everything we might have forgotten we already had. 

 

 

10
Feb
16

GAYBIES

 

GAYBIES

Brisbane Powerhouse

Brisbane Powerhouse Visy Theatre

February 3 – 6 2016

 

Reviewed by Simon Denver

 

gaybies_curtaincall_feb16

 

Verbatim theatre. Bite sized morsels of humanity whose sum of all parts give a well rounded theatrical presentation based on a particular event or theme. It can work particularly well, as in this case, when the performers let the words lead. The power will always be in the honesty of the words; overt characterisation mustn’t distract. In Verbatim theatre the actors are the backing and the words are the lead. In GAYBIES we heard the stories of growing up with a same sex parents. (Well – same sex parents, surrogate mums and donor dads). The people interviewed ranged from 4 year old to 40 year old. This gave fantastic scope for the ensemble of 18.

 

Statistics may say that children of same sex parents make up such a small fraction of society – but that does not detract from the relevance of this work. As I mentioned earlier – society is the sum of all parts. We, as individuals, have an almost moral duty to research, examine or at least familiarise ourselves with as many of those working parts of life as possible – No matter how the findings might be at odds with our “white bread 2.2 children” view of life. In fact, having same sex marriage as a political issue de jour only amplifies this production’s relevance.

 

For over seventy minutes we were presented with stories. Honest stories and clear memories.

 

Too embarrassed to tell your friends your parents are gay. An awkward scenario. But then again, lots of people have always been embarrassed to tell their friends that their parents were Nudists / Mormons / Swingers / National Party Members etc. The charades of truth (“If anyone asks I sleep in this room and Bob sleeps in that room”). But then again, what family doesn’t play out its charade of little white lies? The more stories that flooded the stage the more you realised that these stories were running a parallel course to most people’s stories. Finding so many touchstones within such a small statistic can only serve to humanise as oppose to demonise. It was a gentle reminder that whether parents are the same sex, (or from different religions, race, creed or colour for that matter), in the end it doesn’t matter. A house of love and laughter can only come from love at its core.

gaybies_gayaussie_feb16

 

By default or design the limited two-day rehearsal period meant scripts on stage were going to be a necessity. But a two-day rehearsal period with the calibre of the cast involved was always going to make this a very up-market rehearsed reading. Quite a tough brief really. Find the natural flow and rhythms of the words yet continually have to remind your self what the words are. Personally I thought those almost rhythmic glances at the scripts constantly reinforced the fact that these were someone else’s stories. I suppose its like the subtitles in a foreign film. If the film is good you don’t notice that you are reading. The words are not those of professional writers. They are the words of the average man / woman very creatively “cut and pasted” together by Dean Bryant. It was a great “ensemble” piece. And the ensemble did a mighty job. The direction by Kris Stewart was as much as can be expected from a two day rehearsal. Again, without the time to be flash, complex, personal or brave, the direction seemed to merely be there to set the words free.

 

All in all it was an incredibly feel good journey.

 

The Ensemble itself consisted of professional actors and social / media commentators. With that in mind it’s unfair and impossible to single any individual out .. .. .. .. .. (Damn! Can’t back that up! Margi Brown Ash’s four-year-old on a bike was the show stopper for me. Still chuckling at that little gem days later). They were a unified front and they were all on the same page. For that I say to them all – Thank you. So Barbara Lowing, Bec Zanetti, Blair Martin, Kurt Phelan, Libby Anstis, Lizzie Moore, Brad Rush, Brittany Francis, Christopher Wayne, Margi Brown Ash, Pam Barker, Pat O’Neil, David Berthold, Emily Gilhome, Gordon Hamilton, Rebecca McIntosh, Xanthe Coward, Michael James, Dean Bryant, Kris Stewart, Joseph Simons and Jason Glenwright .. .. when you get a moment, give yourselves a pat on the back. You collectively acheived a great thing.

 

However, (and there are always howevers) .. ..

 

GAYBIES slapped the face of the economic rational of current theatre. It was the first time for a while where I witnessed a professional stage creaking, groaning and crammed with performers. Does this mean if we want quality and quantity we can only expect it from Verbatim Theatre? Is the future for large cast rehearsed readings? It’s sad that the size of the average cast is dwindling. It’s even sadder that the cast size can dictate any artistic process. So thank you Brisbane Powerhouse for giving us a brief respite from the so-called “economic reality”.

 

I thought the production was a tad too long and perhaps a couple of performers too many. I thought the music was beautiful and exceptionally well delivered but I had difficulty marrying it to the words and stories. My main criticism was quite simply that it was preaching to the converted. It was a safe option to stage it during the MELT festival (A Celebration of Queer Arts and Culture).

This production needs to jump its rails and be taken to the wider community. It needs to be seen by the detractors not the sympathisers. I feel it is the perfect vehicle to confront those who passively or covertly or overtly demonise anything gay. This plays humanity is undeniable.

Finally I felt it only took or was told good, warm and fuzzy stories. Nothing is perfect, nothing is 100%. I would just liked to have heard one negative experience, as I am sure there are, have been and will be.

 

But the last few comments aside, it was a great night out. I hadn’t been quite sure what to expect but I left the Powerhouse smiling .. .. and thinking. Thank you to all concerned. Well worth the 200k return trip from the Sunshine Coast.

 

GAYBIES_cast_closingnight_feb16

 

 

30
Oct
13

Motherland opens at Metro Arts tonight!

 

Three women, exiled from their homelands, find their lives are woven together across continents and decades…

 

motherland

 

Shortlisted  for  the  2013  Patrick  White  Playwrights’  Award,  Katherine  Lyall-­‐Watson’s  play Motherland  heads  for   the  stage  with  emerging  director,  Caroline  Dunphy,  and  a  stellar  cast  including  Barbara  Lowing,  Kerith  Atkinson,   Rebecca  Riggs,  Peter  Cossar  and  Daniel  Murphy.  Metro  Arts’  Season  of  the  Independents  presents  this  epic  story,   which  spans  the  twentieth  century,  World  War  and  the  Russian  Revolution.

 

Motherland  is  a  story  about  three  remarkable  real  women:  there’s  Nell  Tritton,  of  Brisbane’s  Tritton  furniture   emporium,  who  married  Russia’s  deposed  Prime  Minister,  Alexander  Kerensky,  and  helped  him  escape  from  the   Nazis  in  the  Second  World  War;  there’s  Nina  Berberova,  a  Russian  writer  living  in  exile  in  Paris  with  her  lover,  the   poet  Vladislav  Khodasevich;  and  there’s  Alyona,  a  Russian  museum  curator  stuck  in  Brisbane  at  the  height  of  the   Fitzgerald  Inquiry  when  her  Australian  husband’s  business  goes  bankrupt.

 

The  three  stories  are  woven  together  into  a  rich  tapestry  that  plays  with  history,  as  it  reveals  the  price  of  betrayal   and  the  lure  of  forbidden  love.

 

After  four  years  of  research  and  writing,  Katherine  Lyall-­‐Watson  is  still  just  as  intrigued  by  the  real  people  at  the   heart  of  the  play  as  she  was  on  the  day  she  started  writing.  “The  best  and  worst  thing  about  researching  history,”   she  says,  “is  that  it’s  never  finished.  It’s  been  four  years  and  Nell  is  still  an  enigma.  Her  family  helped  shape   Brisbane  and  her  life  was  extraordinary,  but  history  has  forgotten  her.  Writing  Motherland  has  been  a  way  to   bring  her  back  to  life  and  to  re-­‐imagine  some  of  the  moments  that  defined  her.”

 

Timeframes  and  locations  collide  and  interweave  as  the  actors  play  multiple  characters  in  this  fast-­‐paced  and   passionate  90-­‐minute  theatrical  depiction  of  true  stories.  Caroline  Dunphy’s  direction  brings  rigour  and  fierceness   to  this  contemporary  staging.

 

Metro  Arts  is  proud  to  present  the  premiere  production  of  Motherland.  Liz  Burcham,  CEO  of  Metro  Arts  says,   “Katherine  Lyall-­‐Watson  is  an  extremely  proficient  playwright  and  we  are  honoured  to  co-­‐present  the  very  first   production  of  her  writings.  Her  plays  need  to  be  seen.” Book here.

 

Motherland