Posts Tagged ‘AFL

15
Jul
15

The Forwards

 

The Forwards

Zeal Theatre & The Arts Centre Gold Coast

The Space, The Arts Centre Gold Coast

July 9 – 18 2015

 

Reviewed by Katy Cotter

 

theforwards

 

In 2004 founder of Zeal Theatre, Stefo Nantsou, was asked to create a piece of ‘contemporary theatre reflecting the experiences of young people in regional communities.’ The company ran workshops at numerous high schools that revealed common issues surrounding sport, alcohol and drug abuse, unemployment and small town rivalries. Nantsou took these stories, transforming them into a play for three actors.

 

In collaboration with Shock Therapy Productions and The Arts Centre Gold Coast, The Forwards is both hilarious and heart-wrenching, focusing on the Pintoon Parrots, who have made it to the AFL grand final.

 

The whole town has come to support their boys, in particular the three stellar kickers – Rabbit, Hoges and Tractor. It all begins the night before the big game when everyone is partying hard. The narrative follows the three kickers as they struggle with the pressures of being the best and denying the temptations of alcohol, drugs and reckless behaviour.

 

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The audience is first introduced to Julie, Rabbit’s girlfriend, both played by Ellen Bailey. Julie is worried that Rabbit’s fascination with drugs will jeopardise his chance to prove his sporting talent. Bailey moves between the two characters with ease, playing Julie with a captivating sensitivity that has the audience hanging on her every word, and then switching to the hot-headed Rabbit who keeps his hands in his pockets and eyes to the ground. Hoges (Sam Foster) and Tractor (Hayden Jones) are Rabbit’s best friends and the relationship between the three changes drastically. Foster and Jones, founders of Shock Therapy Productions, are two extremely skilled actors who completely immerse themselves in the physicality of their characters. Jones also plays the role of the Coach, and anyone who grew up watching their brothers play footy, will recognize that Jones’ portrayal is spot on.

 

There are so many comical characters the actors portray which display their versatility and help build the image of an entire town.

 

Nanstou and co-founder of Zeal Theatre, Rob Dilley, made cameo appearances as some of the townsfolk when they weren’t playing the musical score for the show. Situated at the back of the stage, Dilley kept the beat on the drums while Nanstou played guitar. Their presence doesn’t pull attention away from the action happening on stage. They keep their focus on the actors and remain within the world of the show.

 

Nanstou’s performance as Julie’s Dad is distressing and the symbol of the coke can is one I won’t forget.

 

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Zeal Theatre is known for their style of physical theatre and it is one of the play’s greatest strengths.

 

The choreography of the football game has all the drama and physical finesse as the real thing, and is accompanied by a high intensity drum solo by Dilley. Although some of the sound effects made by the actors and the use of mime were sometimes unnecessary and distracting, the commitment to every movement throughout the entirety of the play made it difficult for the audience to disengage. Without giving too much away, there is a scene where a series of repetitive gestures spoke louder than words, and this is a true testament to Nantsou’s direction. The scene was far more emotional and engaging without dialogue, leaving the audience to fill in the silence with their own experience of grief.

 

The Forwards explores themes of friendship, betrayal and the disastrous ramifications of binge-drinking.

 

The story has a perfect balance of drama and comedy and must be told so that history is not repeated. The unbelievable pressure put upon young people to succeed is a harsh reality and the current sporting culture we have in Australia cannot be ignored. You have to be the best otherwise you’re nothing. The Forwards remind us that the upmost importance is nurturing and encouraging our young athletes in positive ways. Season must finish Saturday.

 

 

SUPPORT SHOCK THERAPY’S PRODUCTION OF THE PILLOWMAN HERE

 

 

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19
Oct
12

Managing Carmen

Managing Carmen

Managing Carmen

Queensland Theatre Company & Black Swan State Theatre Company

QPAC Playhouse

13th October – 4th November 2012

  

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

I tell you what. Get your iCal out in front of you, work out when you can go (at least once), get onto the Queensland Theatre Company’s website to book your tickets and then come back to this window to read my review. Otherwise you might miss out on seeing DAVID WILLIAMSON’S BEST PLAY YET.

 

“David Williamson has the ability to pinpoint a societal issue and expose it through his unique satirical lens.”

Wesley Enoch

 

Managing Carmen is outstanding. It’s tighter, funnier, slicker and more satirical than anticipated. The text is peppered with gag lines, perfectly timed; only a master craftsman like Williamson can convincingly achieve this sort of perfect comedy. It’s already on its way to becoming a massive box office success and it’s essential viewing for anyone who loves their footy and/or high fashion. Or who wants to be entertained during a night out at the theatre. Not such a rare thing in Brisbane this year. Aren’t we lucky?!

 

Managing Carmen

David Williamson, in case you’ve been living in a yurt in Turkey since the 70s, is our most prolific playwright, supposedly “retired” in 2005 (Influence would have been his final work!), but in stubborn objection to ill health and with the help of modern medicine, a theme that features prominently in the 2011 work At Any Cost, Williamson has continued to chronicle our country’s social and political history, providing plum roles for Australian actors and consistently offering on a silver platter, script after script to make any director’s mouth water with the rich potential of each dish. Williamson’s list of plays reads like a degustation menu. See below.

With Managing Carmen already under option, I can’t help but wonder who will make the movie that chronicles David Williamson’s extraordinary life and career? But before we get ahead of ourselves let me tell you about the play.

 

Wait. You have booked your tickets now, haven’t you? Okay. Just checking. You know I don’t want you to miss this one.

Tim Dashwood, sculpted, taut and terrific in the role, is Brent Lyall, the extraordinarily talented two-time Brownlow Medal winning 23-year old AFL star player and…cross-dresser. His addiction is “sufficiently unusual for him and his manager and the rest of the team to be terrified if the word gets out” (David Williamson, interviewed by Frank Hatherley for Stage Whispers). Dashwood proves in this role that he is equally at home in heels or football boots. I hope he feels he can share at some stage his recent training program, diet and supplement intake. Every husband needs to know. Not necessarily the heel practicing (well, they’ve all had a go at that, haven’t they? Well, haven’t they?!), but definitely the hard-core training to get in peak physical condition. Just saying. Dashwood’s super confident, relaxed, sexy and stylish performance as Brent-as-Carmen (that’s Carmen Getme) is a much better pitch for a role in Priscilla, Queen of the Desert than any of those seen on I Will Survive and I won’t be at all surprised if his next offer comes from the producers of a revival (the show closed on Broadway in June). Well, you know Dashwood’s also a singer, right? And he can dance! In heels! On a revolving, glossy, black tiled floor! While it struck me that perhaps his monotone was a bit much at first, I realised almost within the same instant that I HAVE HEARD ELITE SPORTSMAN SPEAK THIS WAY. Also, many, many teenaged boys. We’ll just stop for a moment to acknowledge that this play is for all ages and all sorts. I hope that many, many men and women, of all ages, can bring themselves to turn off the TV, get up off the lounge and get to this show. Williamson writes not just for the “elite” baby-boomer theatregoers but also for everyone now. In fact, I’m in awe of the man’s research skills and application of contemporary Australian language to give us beautifully drawn characters that we feel we already know.

Claire Lovering is Jessica Giordano, the corporate confidence boosting, image-grooming psychologist and eventual love interest (no spoiler there, it’s pretty obvious from the outset and you’re in for a delightful surprise when that deal is sealed with a kiss! A little bit of Luhrmann creeping in there. I almost expected to hear the moon singing! It’s a brave ending and I love it!). Lovering’s finest moment is her penultimate one, but only because we go with her, every step of the way, on her journey to that point.

Anna McGahan Managing Carmen

Anna McGahan, who plays the girlfriend, paid to pose by Lyall’s side for the paps by his ruthless, money-hungry manager, Rohan Swift (John Batchelor), totes pulls off saying “totes” and does so while adopting that odd WAGS cum Orange County Housewife accent that we hear on the red carpet when one of the hotter halves has been asked which designer she is wearing and which often indicates a jet-setting vaporous existence amongst those who have more money than (fashion) sense. Of course I’m over-generalising… Anyway, I love the way McGahan changes sides; the alliance between she and Carmen is completely genuine and their beautifully girly BFF behaviour – most of all their outrageous drunken behaviour – has us in stitches. It’s a very funny play and Wesley Enoch’s deft hand and his fearless, fun approach in directing it is obvious.

John Batchelor is, strangely, halfway to being endearing as Swift; we almost believe that he cares a little bit about his client’s wellbeing…until we see time and time again that he doesn’t! We wonder at first at his groovy moves and frustrated antics and vocals (they come across at first as a little too OTT), but because they’re funny they’re easily forgiven and as the character settles they begin to make sense. I won’t spoil the opening for you. Suffice to say, from the outset, Batchelor is the Basil Fawlty of this farce, skilfully, relentlessly driving the action and flawless Williamson brand of comedy as Enoch sees it.

In fact, it takes a little while to accept that we’re in the middle of a modern-day farce. As Kate Foy observed during interval, instead of doors opening and closing all over the place, we have an eleven metre revolve, which helps keep the action fast and funny, as the actors fall over furniture to get to their next scene. It sounds clumsy but it’s not; it’s beautifully choreographed. While we’re on it, the set almost steals the show; it’s truly gasp-worthy. Designed by Richard Roberts (assisted by Isobel Hutton), the use of this stunning black floored revolve in this space is a coup for Queensland Theatre Company and QPAC’s Playhouse. I love it and I’d love to see more of it. Lit by Black Swan’s Trent Suidgeest, we feel at home in Lyall’s apartment, Swift’s office, a bar, a nightclub and out in the open by the sea, with the help of projected images of clouds and the sounds of a seascape (Sound Designer Tony Brumpton). The only let down on opening night was that the first visual failed to appear on the television screen in Swift’s office, however, that’s an easy fix. Not so easy, now that the season has begun, would be to ask a favour of Eddie McGuire and have The Footy Show excerpts pre-filmed. This extra effort, rather than playing the audio recorded by the actors over random mismatched footage, would make this production faultless. (Audio Visual Designer Declan McMonagle). Also, I appeared to be overdressed in an old LBD and new, flat Siren Bolly shoes, however, that’s just a note to self. I am yet to work out the dress code for Brisbane opening nights. Clearly, so are others. What do you wear to opening nights? Do you dress thematically? I’d like to know. The Brisbane theatre scene is evolving and it feels like it’s time to give the social photographers something special to shoot!

Managing Carmen is stylish, slickly designed and superbly written, directed and performed. It places the spotlight unforgivingly over our obsession with celebrity and the insane pursuit of sponsorship and monetary gain over recognition and reward for true talent in just about every arena. Challenging our levels of tolerance, understanding and acceptance of difference in an entertaining, energetic farce, Wesley Enoch’s production of David Williamson’s Managing Carmen is a true blue theatrical triumph.

Anna McGahan & Tim Dashwood Managing Carmen

David Williamson – list of plays

The Indecent Exposure of Anthony East (1968)

You’ve Got to Get on Jack (1970)

The Coming of Stork (1970)

The Removalists (1971)

Don’s Party (1971)

Jugglers Three (1972)

What If You Died Tomorrow? (1973)

The Department (1975)

A Handful of Friends (1976)

The Club (1977)

Travelling North (1979)

Celluloid Heroes (1980)

The Perfectionist (1982)

Sons of Cain (1985)

Emerald City (1987)

Top Silk (1989)

Siren (1990)

Money and Friends (1991)

Brilliant Lies (1993)

Sanctuary (1994)

Dead White Males (1995)

Heretic (1996)

Third World Blues (1997, An Adaptation Of Jugglers Three)

After The Ball (1997)

Corporate Vibes (1999)

Face to Face (2000)

The Great Man (2000)

Up for Grabs (2001)

A Conversation (2001)

Charitable Intent (2001)

Soulmates (2002)

Flatfoot (2003)

Birthrights (2003)

Amigos (2004)

Operator (2005)

Influence (2005)

Lotte’s Gift (2007) – also known as Strings Under My Fingers

Scarlett O’Hara at the Crimson Parrot (2008)

Let The Sunshine[4] (2009)

Don Parties On (2011)

At Any Cost? (2011)

Nothing Personal (2011)

When Dad Married Fury (2011)

Managing Carmen (2012)

Managing Carmen moves to Black Swan State Theatre Company’s Heath Ledger Theatre 10th November – 2nd December and, with an entirely different cast, directed by Mark Kilmurry, Ensemble Theatre presents their production of Managing Carmen 6th December – January 25th.

A live simulcast of the world premiere co-production from the Black Swan Theatre Company (Perth) with Queensland Theatre Company will be presented on 30th November in the Cummins Theatre, WA.

David Williamson’s MANAGING CARMEN is a “laugh-out-loud comedy for anyone who likes who likes football or designer dresses and a crackling funny dissection of stereotypes in sport. Brent is a country boy turned footy star: captain of his AFL team, king of product-endorsements, with a model girlfriend and ruthless sports manager. But Brent’s hiding one little thing that could ruin his career and end the advertising money: his passion for cross-dressing….”

Cast includes: John Batchelor, Timothy Dashwood, Claire Lovering, Anna McGahan, and Greg McNeil

Directed by Wesley Enoch

***This live simulcast event is FREE***

Friday, 30 November at 730pm
the Cummins Theatre
31 Bates Street
Merredin, Western Australia

 

11
Jun
12

The Truth About Kookaburras

The Truth About Kookaburras

La Boite Indie & Pentimento Productions

The Roundhouse

6th – 23rd June 2012

On Saturday night, the men in the audience at The Roundhouse far outnumbered the women. Had they seen The Truth About Kookaburras at Metro Arts in 2009? Had they heard about it? What had they heard? I’d heard that there would be many naked men on stage but that the play “isn’t about the nudity”. It’s about a murder that occurs during a buck’s party, held in the locker room of the Gold Coast Kookaburras Football Club and the mystery of “what it is to be a man”.

I daresay I’ll be the only person in the world to feel this way about this incredible play. Or perhaps I’ll be the only one to say so. You see, it’s absolutely brilliant. But it’s not quite there yet. It seems it’s esteemed playwright, Edward-Who’s-Afraid-of-Virginia-Woolf-Albee, who is to blame for the issues I have with this, the first production of La Boite’s Indie program for 2012, Sven Swenson’s re-worked epic, The Truth About Kookaburras.

Apparently, when workshopping the play with Albee, Swenson was advised, “Never permit it to be done without nudity. Don’t allow yourself to be talked into cleaving it into two acts. Don’t ever shorten it. Don’t become convinced to amalgamate roles and reduce the cast.”

Let’s look at these pearls of wisdom, shall we?

Nudity

The play opens on an empty locker room at the Gold Coast Kookaburras headquarters, which gradually fills with naked men. And by fills, I mean that there are enough of them to literally fill the small space that is the La Boite Indie stage. The play would work better in the round (or in Jupiter’s Casino) but that means – surely – another creative development phase before it earns a mainstage season. It’s an indulgent but rather clever, multi-layered text that you can read yourself, thanks to Playlab’s new digital publication series (Playab Indie).

For fifteen minutes, naked men appear from out of the showers, one after the other after the other and we look at – or try not to look at – the many, many flaccid penises on stage. It’s not a pretty sight. Sorry, boys but it’s not. Swenson recently told Zenobia Frost, in an interview for RAVE magazine that he believes “the most compelling and arresting visual image of masculinity is surely an army of naked men.” Perhaps it is…if that army of naked men is as ripped as QTC’s Romeo and Juliet boys were (credit where credit’s due) and their members stand as erect as the men themselves, sure. But try putting an erect penis on a Queensland stage. Twenty-two of them in fact. And for fifteen minutes! In this case, the “army” more closely resembles a sad, impotent, insecure gang of little boys who need to perform dick tricks and indulge in gratuitous antics to prove their (false) bravado to the fellas who are supposed to be their “mates”.

The Truth About Kookaburras

Image by Kate O’Sullivan.

And I’m sorry but I don’t get the penis humour. I don’t understand the culture of the male locker room. I know that there’s a demographic in every city who do appreciate this brand of comedy – I used to sell cigarettes to them in dodgy clubs and pubs – but personally, I’ve never understood how people can speak to each other the way that these guys do, with so little regard for another person’s feelings. What does it prove? What sort of man is it that treats a person so appallingly? I can see that we’re trying to understand men and their insecurities. I can see that it takes time to establish the confusion and complexities of being a man. We don’t often talk openly about the way men fit into the world and clearly we need to. But is this play the vehicle for it? Will it reach enough people? Would it work better as a screenplay? Would it get closer to the truth if it were Russell Crowe and Hugh Jackman discussing the big issues on the big screen? (Well, of course it would!). Does it really get us any closer to, “What it is to be a man”? As it is, it certainly gets us talking so perhaps, on that point alone, it serves a valuable purpose and the potential to take it to the broader market will be recognised eventually.

It certainly reveals more than you might expect but if it’s really just the full frontal nudity you’re after, I think your money might be better spent on a night with the Chippendales or on some of the better Internet porn sites. (Trekkie Monster was right all along!).

For me, Kookaburras contains too much nudity for too long without good reason. It doesn’t last long enough “for people to realise what a big deal it isn’t,” it lasts long enough to be ineffective dramatically. It loses impact. The dick tricks, the narcissistic mirror play (do let me know if all that mirror acting works for you), the play fights and the real fights are quite simply uninteresting after the first six or seven minutes. (That’s not to say that the simulated footy, choreographed by Brian Lucas and the fight sequences, choreographed by Justin Palazzo-Orr are lacking in any way. They just need more space to make them look spectacular). And while I appreciate that there has been some research done and that conversations with legitimate footballers have taken place, I find it hard to believe that there is not even a modicum of modesty amongst this group, who are not, as we discover, all that they seem. So many characters and so little, when they are naked, to differentiate one from another; I would just like to have seen the extent of male nudity be used to better effect than to try to prove a political point.

On that (political point), I was surprised to see later, the female stripper do her thing…topless. Only topless. Now, I know this play is not about her (far be it from the stripper to become a distraction in the midst of all that male soul-searching) and I know Swenson feels that women and not men have been made to get their gear off in plays for too long (“He didn’t think that was fair.”) but I think an entire truth was missed there. Again, dramatically, it was an interesting choice. “Perhaps having more male nudity on stage might legitimise the relative frequency with which we ask it of women.” No, Sven, the authenticity of the story telling and the believability of the acting within the context of whatever story is being told is what legitimises female nudity in the theatre.

Warning: shameless self-promotion.

For a case in point, if it interests you (call it “research”), see Erotique at Noosa Arts Theatre during the Noosa Longweekend, in which nudity is not gratuitously used but, within the context of the story telling, becomes a vital element, both in character and plot development. Right. Shameless self-promotion over. Back to Kookaburras, which is not even about the nudity but phew! What a relief it is to see everybody dressed! “We see much more clearly who each character is once they are dressed and wearing the garb that identifies them to the outside world.” True. The stellar performances in the end come from Cameron Sowden (Mick), Jason McKell (Two-Shoes), Zachary Boulton (Goony) and Kieran Law (Toaster). You can read the complete biographies of all cast members by downloading the online program.

Jason McKell. Image by Kate O’Sullivan.

Don’t allow yourself to be talked into cleaving it into two acts. Don’t ever shorten it.

Mr Albee, why would you say that?! The play is too long! Act 2 is superfluous and once the premise has been established during the opening fifteen minutes of the play, it is reinforced ad nauseam for the next fifty! Seriously, an hour of swinging dicks and putting down mates is too long! With a more concise story, the police investigation incorporated as it is – a clever device and less of it would work even more efficiently – one interval would suffice.

When we were in Sydney in 2011 for the Sydney Children’s Festival, I booked tickets and took our troupe to see Darlinghurst Theatre Company’s production of Alex Broun’s 10 000 Beers, directed by Lee Lewis (Director of La Boite’s last production, A Hoax). Other than my husband, who grew up in a sports-mad household, none of us even knew which code we were about to see. Football is football is football, right? That’s right. Footy novices. Mixed reviews, from us and from the Sydney critics, discussed the value of accurately reflecting the typical Australian loutish and lewd behaviour on stage (ie what can be gained from it apart from appealing to base humour?) and dispelling the myths of men in sport. Neither Broun’s 10 000 Beers nor Swenson’s Kookaburras successfully dispel any of the myths or media hype (both perpetuate the myths and reinforce the stereotypes), however; the latter tries harder. Without offering an answer, in Kookaburras, we take a look at male identity, feminine and masculine roles in society, pack mentality, the notion of mateship, male depression, homophobia and homoeroticism. This piece could start with Act 3 and delve deeper into some of these issues.

Image by Kate O’Sullivan.

Don’t become convinced to amalgamate roles and reduce the cast.”

If I were producing, I would want the roles amalgamated and the cast size reduced. Why not cast fewer actors who can capably play multiple roles? (Some of the actors in this production, unfortunately, struggle to believably portray just one). In its current form, Kookaburras is positively Chekhovian and it need not be. We might get to know the characters a little better and care a little more for them, if we see fewer of them, in greater detail, for (just a little bit) longer.

The strongest of the three acts, the final boasts the best acting of the night and allows us to get to the bottom of the story and understand more about the lives and motives of a couple of the characters. It’s what we’ve been waiting for! The mystery is solved but nothing is really resolved. Men (particularly men involved in sport) are still a mystery and will continue to behave badly, despite their private revelations and their efforts to nurture healthy relationships and a noble – or something – identity. What is it to be a man? Well, I don’t know. And I don’t think you’ll know either, from seeing this play but at least you’ll be challenged to think on it and discuss the big issues with some mates over a few beers.

11
Apr
12

keep the geek alive

Artistic Director of QTC, Wesley Enoch, discusses what it means to “keep the Geek alive” and dismantle the elitist walls surrounding theatre.

By Wesley Enoch. Re-blogged from queenslandtheatrecompany.com

Harold Mitchell, philanthropist and media mogul (in 2011 he was invited by Federal Arts Minister, Simon Crean, to oversee a review of philanthropy in the arts, which, among other things, recommended the new cool kid in town, crowd funding) says that acceptance and positive support has gone hand in hand with creative thinking. Creativity and social tolerance of difference, the tolerance of ideas that may not be your own, has been at the heart of the great societies in our history. He goes on to say that the 19th Century was a European Century that saw a move away from slavery, toward economic expansion, social vitality and a major growth in the arts. The mixture of imagination and courage saw the development of new structures of government and business that delivered greater rewards to its citizens. The 20th Century has been the American Century where the growth of the country has seen science fiction become reality; where the imagination of artists and scientists (Geeks) have created the economic powerhouse of a country of middle class. Mitchell says that within 10 years 50% of the worlds GDP will be created in Asia, bringing us into the Asian Century. His support for the arts is legendary – through his family foundation he gives almost seven million dollars a year to arts and health projects. That is almost three times more than the Australia Council’s project budget for theatre.

Diversity and tolerance, imagination and courage, extreme knowledge and dedicated “geekiness” are the future. For our economic, cultural and social development we must support the arts.

John Holden from Demos in London says the theatre company of the future is not about the walls that keep the company in but more about the networks that enable the work to exist. Theatre companies will become a jumble of informal and formal networks that become active around a live event. He quotes the influential thinker Charles Leadbeater and his work in Manchester where their programming  developed into three streams – Enjoy, Do, Talk. These three areas allow an individual multiple ways of engaging with a company as an audience member, a performer or a contributor to debate and discussion. This engagement can  occur onsite, offsite or online creating exciting multilayered outcomes.

Steven Wolfe from the United States says that the theatre company of the future will have to move from efficiency to effectiveness – look at not the most efficient ways of doing something but what will bring the desired outcomes….because human beings are not always wanting an efficient experience. From sustainability to vibrancy – we should not be happy to merely survive, but we should encourage change and excitement around our companies. Not fixate on maintaining the status quo and giving predictability, but build to be seen as a vibrant and vital place to be, connect with and contribute to.

He also says we must challenge the rhetoric of engagement and replace it with ideas of entanglement….not the ‘us’ bringing art to ‘you’ but about so entangling ourselves in your world that you feel part of an us rather than a ‘them’. This idea that in AFL clubs you have supporters rather than fans. The supporter will follow you regardless of the outcome of the game because the club is part of your identity…a fan comes and goes depending on the fortunes of the club. (Go the Lions!). I reckon we would measure this in how many mutual friends we have rather than how many people have friended us on Facebook.

Ok….what does this have to do with developing a life long love of the arts? For me it’s about seeing the dismantling of barriers…of the walls that Holden talks about….creating new participatory models and challenging the status quo and old world ideas of the unchallenged expert in the arts.

Drama/ theatre has maintained barriers to build a kind of edifice of high art. But this must change; we must dismantle the barriers and create new participatory models, acknowledge and value the ecology of theatrical practice. The idea of the Artistic Director of QTC being in conversation with drama teachers has been anathema in the past and I think we have to change that. It is outdated and wrong. We have to see ourselves as peers in the making and support the art both as practitioners and as people who are supporting artists to grow. If we are going to get 10,000 hours of experience in to young people to be the artists of the future we have to work in partnership. We must remove the barriers and allow people to transition from student to artist to audience member to critic to teacher to supporter. This must happen easily and without value judgement of where you sit in that ecology. The difference between an Artistic Director, the artist and the audience member is merely the position from which we see the art. The challenge for a company like QTC is to not play the status game but to play the ideas game.

I am advocating that we must keep the Geek alive in all of us. The fluid movement of talented and interested people through different forms of theatre based activities, removing barriers and redefining the entry points for people to the ways of making and appreciating the arts is key to building an integrated ecological approach to theatre and drama.

Love,

Wesley

“Being an Artistic Director means being a champion for the art form. For the period of your tenure you are the custodian and you have to grapple with changes in society, to help articulate debates, be the public voice of the form at the time.”

-Wesley Enoch, Artistic Director of QTC