Archive Page 2

29
Sep
17

The Last Five Years – a little chat with Kurt Phelan & Lizzie Moore

 

Wax Lyrical Productions Present The Last Five Years

Brisbane Powerhouse October 7 – 14 2017

 

 

Wax Lyrical Productions bring Jason Robert Brown’s acclaimed 2001 musical, The Last Five Years, to Brisbane with a duo of music theatre heavy-weights.

 

It’s easy to fall in love with Kurt Phelan (Dirty Dancing) and Lizzie Moore (Kiss Me Kate) in this heart-breaking musical two-hander, as they re-trace their relationship from opposite ends. Jamie (Phelan), an up-and-coming writer, struggles to balance his sudden success with his increasingly tumultuous love life.

 

Meanwhile Cathy (Moore), an aspiring actress, deals with the frustrations of her own career while watching her husband from the sidelines in this story of two twenty-somethings who fall in – and out – of love over the course of a five-year relationship.

 

From the director and company behind the Matilda Award Winning Carrie the Musical, Wax Lyrical’s The Last Five Years is an intensely personal look at the rise and fall of a relationship told from both points of view.

 

Let’s just get this one out of the way…did you like the 2014 film starring Jeremy Jordan and Anna Kendrick?

Kurt: I liked it a lot. I was worried when I first heard about it and they would destroy it like they did RENT the film. But I thought it translated well and Michelle who re-choreographed Dirty Dancing for us in Australia was the choreographer.

Lizzie: I didn’t see it and by the time we found out we were doing this musical I felt like I shouldn’t. But I have seen clips for it and heard some of the tracks and I thought it was done really well but they have the advantage of being able to show two people together.

 

Tell us what’s a) universal and b) unique about these characters and their stories?

Kurt: everyone has been in love and everyone has had a break up. Everyone has been at fault and everyone has been hurt. And it’s also about who you resonate with and there are two sides to every story.

Lizzie: And Cathy is an actress full of self-doubt so you know…

 

What do you love about this show and about JRB’s work in general?

Lizzie: The music and the musical themes that continue through the show, the musical motifs.

Kurt: The man knows how to write a song. It’s also a beautiful piece that speaks to almost everyone who has ever heard it. And some of the most challenging music I have ever had to learn. So once you master it is such a joy to perform.

 

Any particular reasons for the super traditional wedding promo shots for the show? 

Kurt: It is the only time the show is written with them in the same time and space. But we wanted to choose an image that would resonate with people, intrigue them and encourage them to find out more.

Lizzie: And reflect that it is a show about two people – love! But also, to reflect the reason they got together.

Kurt: A lot of the time when the show is done it focusses on the heartache but actually, sometimes no one is right or wrong, two people just aren’t suited to be together.

 

 

What’s the relevance/significance/urgency of staging this show this year?

Kurt: I’ve wanted to do it since it came to off-Broadway in 2002 and if I didn’t do it soon I would explode.

Lizzie: And then we had a perfect storm of both being in town and available and Zoë being available too.

Kurt: Also, all of Australia is locked into a conversation around marriage and equality and it’s important, even though this is a heterosexual couple, that people realise that love is love and everyone should have the same opportunity, even if it only lasts five years.

 

What do you hope audiences get from this production?

Kurt: A beautiful night in the theatre where they can marvel how simple storytelling can strike you right to the core.

Lizzie: Yeah you don’t need bells and whistles. Musical theatre can and should be really truthful.

 

What’s the connection between you two and how do you work together?

Kurt: Lizzie and I met in a bath tub at Lucy Durack’s surprise birthday party.

Lizzie: Kurt was wearing her novelty shower cap and we were trying to be quiet but we weren’t very good at it.

Kurt: And it’s from that moment on we were friends. It wasn’t until years later doing GAYBIES at MELT Festival, that we worked together and realised our voices blended perfectly.

 

What are your favourite things about working together?

Lizzie: I think it’s a really intense piece and we look after each other, on and off the stage.

 

Are there any infuriating things?

Kurt: Yes, Lizzie’s jaw clicks and that’s my pet hate in any human, but she can’t help it and she’s pretty, so I’m cool with that.

Lizzie: Kurt has been making out with me with a moustache but apparently he’s going to shave it so that’s OK. And Kurt and I met in a bath tub.

 

Is there a personal connection to the show, with the characters or the situations?

Kurt: I just got out of a five year relationship so yes, I’m equal parts Jamie and Cathy at the moment.

Lizzie: I’ve climbed many a hill before.

Kurt: I mean it’s about love, we’ve all been in situations similar to this. We both come at this show with a great depth of understanding of both sides of the story which is what makes it so interesting to work on.

 

We see this couple trying to mend a broken relationship for so long. What do you think makes them keep trying? What do you feel it’s worth? As a performer, how do you keep the stakes high enough to convincingly tell this story?

Kurt: through our extensive analysis of the characters we found very interesting insights to their romance and being so familiar with the story I thought it was all doom and gloom but when you unpick it, there is actually a beautiful, loving, human relationship worth hanging onto. We’re trying to highlight that as much as possible.

 

 

Away from the theatre, what tends to take you off to Kurt-land / Lizzie-land?

Kurt: I have a huge passion for wine and have been training to be a sommelier, so that helps when working with Lizzie, because she loves to drink it!

Lizzie: (While holding a glass of wine) Mmm hmm… I like cooking and gin, and I’m a small, fluffy dog enthusiast.

 

What made theatre your passion / preferred career?

Lizzie: If I’d be as happy doing anything else, I’d do it.

Kurt: Ditto. It’s the only thing I’m good at.

 

What are your favourite moments on stage so far? (in this and in previous productions)

Kurt: Getting groped by an audience member during a matinee of Dirty Dancing in Brisbane was a definite highlight…

 

What’s next for you two? 

Kurt: I’m headed to New York to observe a few physical theatre companies and write my new cabaret, and to hopefully start the next five years…

Lizzie: I’m on tour in Tasmania and WA next as Patsy Cline in The Coal Miner’s Daughter.

 

What would you like to see more of (in local and national theatres and festivals)?

Kurt: New Australian content of a larger scale and the time to create it properly.

Lizzie: Musical theatre with really great acting and directing. We all love spectacle but that isn’t all musical theatre is.

 

Book online for The Last Five Years presented by Wax Lyrical Productions and directed by Zoe Tuffin at Brisbane Powerhouse October 7 – 14 2017

 

Advertisements
27
Sep
17

Limbo Unhinged

 

Limbo Unhinged

Brisbane Festival

The Courier Mail Magic Mirrors Spiegeltent

September 8 – 30 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

70 minutes of sizzling, sexy, adult circus and cabaret returns to the magnificent Spiegeltent at Brisbane Festival. Strut & Fret, it seems, can do no wrong; the formula and style perfected, the audience lapping up every moment. With only a slight dip in energy and drive, while Remi Martin, in the clown role (no, he’s not scary or silly), spends several minutes miming various approaches to opening an imaginary door. It’s the preset to one of the better pole routines we’ve seen in a while, a sensational display of strength and grace in the most masculine way. Other than this precursor, there’s no lull and we love the spectacle of circus trained sculpted bodies, Heather Holliday’s magnificent fire breathing, sword swallowing and light sabre swallowing (Will we see it glow? We see it glow!), stunning aerials, superb vocals and the graceful, swaying, verging-on-death-defying Chinese Poles. Is it any wonder that there are gasps from the crowd beneath, as the artists dip low enough to give someone a quick kiss on the cheek?!

 

 

Limbo Unhinged is everything we desire in circus right now – we’ve talked about this before – with so many offerings, the best of them in terms of content, style and audience appeal, are still Cirque du Soleil, Casus, Company2 and Scott Maidment’s Strut & Fret, since 1997, delivering on their manifesto to make artistic experiences “breath-taking, heart-gripping, unforgettable and entertaining”. 

 

 

And where their Blanc De Blanc fails to capture the imagination (others loved it but I’ve always found it slightly less tasteful), Strut and Fret’s Limbo and Limbo Unhinged both offer a level of sophistication and sexiness that we demand now in circus and cabaret – there’s no going back to cheap vaudeville stunts unless they can be sold as brilliant parody or a little nod to nostalgia.

 

Sxip Shirey plays a starring role on vocals and a variety of instruments, leading a fabulous band. He’s a quirky figurehead, the lively persona of all upbeat components of the work, which would be nothing without his original compositions and zany personality. But the acrobats also play, stepping in and out of the band to jam at this big, bold party while someone else takes a starring role on stage. 

 

 

There’s really something for everyone. Charlotte O’Sullivan and Nico Jelmoni delight with their daring balances, lifts and counter balances, defying gravity and all common sense. We won’t be trying this at home…without a spotter. The element of danger across all physical feats is just enough to induce a state of excitement and anticipation – we don’t fear for the performers. We’re in awe of their focus and strength and control. There’s the light-hearted, awe-inspiring pole routine, contortion and aerial contortion, a fire breathing counter balance, and the men strutting and dancing, Kinky Boots style, in an epic choreographed number that would put to shame many of the under-30s out for a dance on a Saturday night!

 

 

One of the more elegant moments, reminiscent of the rose petals and paper of Per Te, brings an artist in billowing white to centre stage – for not quite long enough – beneath beautiful lighting that makes her appear almost mystical, a muse. And then she disappears; she’s moonlight and then she’s gone.

 

David Berthold’s Brisbane Festival only brings in or brings back the very best, and Strut & Fret’s Limbo Unhinged is one of the highlights again this year, offering an exciting and erotic, enticingly exotic evening of pure escapism and entertainment we don’t see anywhere else for the rest of the year.

 

 

27
Sep
17

Kinky Boots

 

Kinky Boots

Michael Cassel Group

QPAC Lyric Theatre

August 26 – October 22 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

The most beautiful thing in the world…

 

You realise we’re talking about shoes, don’t you? Callum Francis, completely gorgeous, is unequivocally the SUPERSTAR of this show. Admittedly, Kinky Boots is written to make a star of any performer who lands the role of Lola, but I doubt that just any performer can play the role – own it – the way Callum Francis does. 

 

Of course it’s the right show for right now, when we must continue to challenge everyone in our circles and on the outskirts, to accept a person for who they are. A true celebration of the individual, inspired by real life events, Kinky Boots is honest, uplifting and utterly heartwarming.

 

The medium is the message, with a fabulously talented and diverse cast directed and choreographed by Jerry Mitchell, sharing the story of a failed guy made good through Cyndi Lauper’s music and lyrics, and a lively book with a stack of priceless one-liners (mostly Lola’s) by Harvey Fierstein. It feels like there are too many songs in the show, but who would dare cut anything from a celebrity penned award winning piece?

 

 

Charlie Price is struggling to save the family shoe business and live up to his father’s expectations. Determined to keep the factory from bankruptcy, Charlie meets a fashionable new friend who gives him an outrageous idea that could change both of their destinies.

 

The message couldn’t be clearer. A change of mind can change the world.

 

It’s refreshing to get a complete story unfolding on stage with enough early detail to add colour and depth to the factory setting of Act 1. Otherwise, it’s dimly lit and a bit dull, as befits the daily grind of the family owned business, until Lola’s Angels appear (and we close Act 1 with a fabulous conveyor belt finale), but it’s a space that’s cleverly designed around a central stairway leading to a platform, which oversees the factory floor. This structure also serves as the backdrop to Lola’s more colourful up-late cabaret performances and the bathroom cubicle in which she hides at one stage, when she feels she is at her most vulnerable.

 

 

 

It takes time to establish this charming story though, and the entire first act to reveal the kinky boots! The pace slows each time we come to a ballad and there are several; they make fantastic big sings for the performers but they’re not the most memorable musical theatre numbers of recent years. Fortunately, it’s a talented company with terrific voices (and legs!). Highlights include the showstoppers Sex Is In the Heel, Everybody Says Yeah and Raise You Up/Just Be (with its cheeky Too Funky type vibe). Not My Father’s Son is beautifully, sensitively sung and becomes a poignant turning point in the tale. On the other hand, Lola’s epic Hold Me In Your Heart appears to be included solely so we may enjoy a Whitney Houston moment. And we do, perhaps even more so than during The Bodyguard

 

 

 

Toby Francis as Charlie, gives his heart and soul to the role, his first commercial lead role. He’s in fine voice and despite the plot requiring him to stack it on the catwalk, he wears the two and a half feet of irresistible sex very well! It’s worth noting that the friendship between Charlie and Lola is actually a little like the cheeky, loveable picture book siblings of the same names created by Lauren Child, with the same tenderness and special bond between them, so it is strange that there’s a moment between them involving raised voices and an obstinate decision that takes them in different directions for a bit. This is not anything lacking in the performances or direction, but in the book. No one seems to have stepped up during creative developments or rehearsals to say aloud, that doesn’t seem right. Let’s change it.

 

 

Sophie Wright is hilariously OTT as Lauren; her solo (The History of Wrong Guys) demonstrating superb comic timing and her ability to read the crowd, taking the joke well beyond where others might. The little we see from Tegan Wouters is great, but she’s stuck with one of those underwritten girlfriend roles that doesn’t give her much to do, when we know she’s capable of much more.

 

 

When the music is upbeat and totally sexy you won’t be able to resist clapping along, and you may shed a tear during more sensitive moments.

Kinky Boots has a big heart and it’s a big hit! It’s a fantastic, current, funny and moving family friendly celebration of life in all corners. With a whole lot of glitter and glam and soul to nourish (and decorate) us by the end of it, the message is abundantly clear: the whole world changes when we accept people as they are

 

 

 

 

25
Sep
17

Laser Beak Man

Laser Beak Man

Brisbane Festival, La Boite Theatre Company & Dead Puppet Society

In Association With PowerArts

The Roundhouse

September 9 – 30 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

Laser Beak Man is a triumph on so many levels.

 

The mute titular superhero is the creation of Tim Sharp, diagnosed with autism at age three (now twenty-nine). His mum, Judy Sharp (Associate Producer), refused to believe advice from the experts – that her son would never speak or emote – igniting instead of ignoring, his passion for drawing. Sharp’s colourful world eventually became an 8-episode animated television series and now, thanks to David Morton and Nicholas Paine, the brains behind the award winning Dead Puppet Society, in close collaboration with NYC’s New Victory Theater, a 90-minute vivid and heartwarming stage show.

 

 

Known for their acclaimed productions incorporating beautifully realised puppets (The Wider Earth, Argus and The Harbinger), Morton and Paine collaborated with Sharp and Sam Cromack of Brisbane indie band Ball Park Music (Daniel Hanson, Dean Hanson and Luke Moseley). Sharp’s hilarious visual puns paired with Cromack’s original compositions, slightly reminiscent of the Beatles, create the technicolour world of Laser Beak Man, complete with the first free-flying Air-Orbs in the history of Australian theatre. One seems evil, like a Big Brother eye, and the other a friendlier vessel, for escaping and venturing off into the world. For Brisbane Festival and La Boite to premiere this family friendly, wholly entertaining and life affirming production is a coup.

 

 

The show is deceptively small and dark to start, contained within a black box built high on stage in the traditional orientation, without a hint of colour or drama or finesse. But suddenly, as the plot demands, the black is whisked away and like waking up in Oz, or stepping into Willy Wonka’s chocolate room, we’re treated to the digital visual spectacle of Laser Beak Man’s Power City (Design Jonathan Oxlade & Projection Design Justin Harrison with Sound by Tony Brumpton and Lighting by Jason Glenwright).

Power City was once the most beautiful city in the world – clean, pure, perfect – and local hero Laser Beak Man worked hard to keep it that way.

Drawing energy from the underground Magna Crystals that powered the city, his beak-shot lasers turned bad things to good. But now the city isn’t what it used to be and Laser Beak Man is thoroughly over it. That is until his estranged childhood friends Peter Batman and Evil Emily return and steal the Magna Crystals. Robbed of his super powers, Laser Beak Man has one last chance to reinvent Power City and save his oldest buddies before they destroy everything.

 

 

So the premise is a simple superhero story – Laser Beak Man and his friends must work together to overcome evil and save the world! – but the visual splendour and the cheeky characters inhabiting this place (and the talented artists who bring them to life on stage) are simply extraordinary. The cast comprises Nathaniel P. Claridad, Jeremy Neideck, Lauren Jackson, Jon Riddleberger, Betsy Rosen, Helen Stephens and Maren Searle, with a special guest appearance from Leigh Sales, her pre-recorded voice and her animated likeness anyway, as the Reporter. There’s not a weak link among them, and in a superior display of collective skill and connection, there are often up to three or four ensemble members manipulating a single puppet.

 

 

The script bubbles over with lovely silly comedy and some of our favourite puns include a series of terribly funny tomato puns, including the slightly vain hope after several minutes of them, that the projection designer doesn’t run out of tomato puns! Poppy forgets to continue reading the captions sliding by beneath the action and when I tell her later she laughs. She says, IT’S A KIDS’ SHOW BUT IT’S FOR ADULTS! There’s really something for everyone: while its innocence is refreshing, and totally fine for the kids (recommended for 8+), there are plenty of political references for the millennials and parentals.

 

Laser Beak Man, a Brisbane Festival highlight, is a delight for all the family, full of joy and optimism, and very obviously originating from the simple goodness of genuine hearts able and willing to turn their creative talents / superpowers into making the world a better place through good old fashioned high-tech theatrical storytelling.

16
Sep
17

I Just Came To Say Goodbye

 

I Just Came to Say Goodbye

The Good Room

Theatre Republic – The Block

September 13 – 23 2017

 

Reviewed by Xanthe Coward

 

 

EVERYTHING IS NOT OKAY.

 

Strangely, forgiveness never arises from the part of us that was actually wounded. The wounded self may be the part of us incapable of forgetting, and perhaps, not actually meant to forget, as if, like the foundational dynamics of the physiological immune system our psychological defences must remember and organize against any future attacks — after all, the identity of the one who must forgive is actually founded on the very fact of having been wounded.

 

Stranger still, it is that wounded, branded, un-forgetting part of us that eventually makes forgiveness an act of compassion rather than one of simple forgetting. To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt…

 

David Whyte

 

In 2002 a DHL cargo plane and a Russian passenger jet collided in Swiss-controlled airspace over southern Germany, killing 68 Russian school students, two pilots and Mr Vitaly Kaloyev’s wife and two children. This story is told plainly and simply, chillingly, in tiny pieces, using surprisingly little text. Intricately interwoven along the way are numbered anonymous apologies and offers of forgiveness (or refusals to forgive or to be forgiven) selected from hundreds of online contributions to The Good Room’s website for their newly devised show, I Just Came to Say Goodbye. All the elements come together perfectly, which is no surprise to those who know The Good Room’s previous productions. We know the formula works; we adored I Want to Know What Love Is, which premiered during Brisbane Festival 2014 and enjoyed a return season at Brisbane Powerhouse in 2015, and I Should Have Drunk More Champagne at Metro Arts in 2013.

 

The Good Room has never let the vampires get in the way of making an original show.

 

Directed by Daniel Evans and co-created with Amy Ingram, Caroline Dunphy, Lauren Clelland and Kieran Swann, this is the work that’s consistently disrupting Queensland’s arts’ ecology, demanding more from artists and audiences, and offering a richer, more complex, lingering and affecting theatrical experience.

 

I would like to have the time to sit in on the company’s creative process and tell you more about it because not enough theatre is being dreamed onto our stages in this way, and not enough of our theatre makers believe they can do likewise. This is largely because our training and our theatrical tradition is still so text-based. (We could argue that The Good Room’s trilogy of shows is text-based, but that would be over-simplifying the work and under-valuing the creative process).

 

 

The company’s next work (I’ve Been Meaning to Ask You) will involve young people in its creative development and performance. For some, it may be their first foray into devising from scratch. (Can we note, it’s simply not soon enough to be exploring the work of companies such as Gob Squad, Frantic Assembly and Complicite at a Masters level!). I hope The Good Room’s process becomes a preferred model of devising theatre with students especially, so we might see the process included in the curriculum for Years 10 – 12. Sure, something like it, within “physical theatre” vaguely happens now, depending on the awesomeness of the teachers involved and the cooperation of admin, however; even with an abundance of new work, we’re still seeing chasms in this country between theatre, physical theatre and dance. (Within an intelligently programmed arts festival the gap is less apparent).

 

The truth is, rarely can a response make something better — what makes something better is connection.

– Brené Brown

 

Despite closing with a burst of silver glitter and opening with an eighties’ daggy dance team dressed in Brisbane Festival hot pink (choreographed by Nerida Matthaei, hysterical!), I Just Came to Say Goodbye is necessarily dark. It delves into a place we don’t like to go, exploring the vulnerability that lies at the heart of our anger and our resistance to forgiveness. Can we ever really forgive another? Can we ever forget the things another has said or done to make us feel such anger/betrayal/bitterness in the first place? What happens when we choose not to forgive? In the case of Mr Kaloyev and – spoiler alert – the family and friends of his victim, there’s no happy ending.

 

 

To forgive is to assume a larger identity than the person who was first hurt.

 

The inability to forgive seems more often than not to lead to violence, a person lashing out against another, staged literally by The Good Room in an impressive extended fight sequence. Choreographed by Justin Palazzo-Orr it must be the longest continuous fight sequence we’ve seen on a Brisbane stage. It’s violent and tender and funny and tragic. Caroline Dunphy’s movement is always captivating but this performance is next level neo-butoh. She’s a wicked nymph, leaping and climbing and crawling all over Thomas Larkin (who has his own stunning image making moments at the beginning of the show), and hanging from him to create a disturbing, broken picture, to be read as a moment of grief, or the resolve of a ghost, or simply, and complicatedly, a reference to some degree of Stockholm Syndrome in the relationship. (Are there degrees of Stockholm Syndrome?). Or it’s something else entirely, depending, I suppose, on what sort of day/week/month/year/life you’ve had. The intimate moment that precedes this suffering though, is unmistakably a representation of the couple’s abject despair, beautifully, tenderly realised. This sort of intimate connection between performers takes time to develop and direct, and skill to replicate, or discover again, each and every night of the season. It’s so desperately sad. Meanwhile, Amy Ingram is a wildcat, and Michael Tuahine is both fierce and funny in attacking and being attacked. Satisfyingly, everyone ends up fighting everyone; it’s horrifying and highly entertaining. There’s certainly a little schadenfreude at work here.

 

 

Anger truly felt at its center is the essential living flame of being fully alive and fully here; it is a quality to be followed to its source, to be prized, to be tended, and an invitation to finding a way to bring that source fully into the world through making the mind clearer and more generous, the heart more compassionate and the body larger and strong enough to hold it. What we call anger on the surface only serves to define its true underlying quality by being a complete but absolute mirror-opposite of its true internal essence.

– David Whyte

 

Jason Glenwright’s apocalyptic lighting comprises search lights and pin spots and a whole lot of blackness. At times, through the haze, we barely see faces but the voices and the silences between the words convey anything we think we might have missed with our eyes. And played in traverse with the audience seated on two opposite sides, we may well miss something from time to time. Just as in life, this is okay; we see what we want to see precisely the way we want to see it. At the other end of the technical spectrum and across the Theatre Republic at La Boite are the bright lights of Laser Beak Man, also designed by Glenwright. The guy is versatile to say the least! Underscored by Dane Alexander, I Just Came to Say Goodbye wouldn’t work nearly as well without its lights to pierce the darkness and a soundscape to scrape our souls (it’s absolutely terrifying, jarring; try not to be affected).

 

FORGIVENESS is a heartache and difficult to achieve because strangely, it not only refuses to eliminate the original wound, but actually draws us closer to its source. To approach forgiveness is to close in on the nature of the hurt itself, the only remedy being, as we approach its raw center, to reimagine our relation to it.

– David Whyte

 

I Just Came to Say Goodbye is a stunning result from what would seem a simple process on paper, but actually, in anyone else’s hands could be a colossal disaster. What Daniel Evans and Amy Ingram appear to do is to throw everything onto the floor – a vast collection of ideas and feelings and responses to real events and crowdsourced verbatim material – pour fuel over it, and set it on fire to create a spectacular event and food for thought, for a life outside the theatre that demands our burning presence.

 

15
Sep
17

Trigger Warning

 

Trigger Warning

Zoe Coombs Marr & Token Events

Theatre Republic – La Boite Studio

September 12 – 15 2017

 

Reviewed by Heather Blacklock

 

 

Zoe Coombs Marr brought Trigger Warning to the La Boite Studio for four shows only. Outside, in the precinct, an incredible space called Theatre Republic has been re-built for Brisbane Festival. There’s live music, scrappy bars, food stalls and seating to spare before you go in to see your show. I felt like I was in a giant treehouse.

 


I deliberately went into this show with very little information about what I was going to see. All I had picked up was that Zoë performs as the satirical character Dave. A fact I forgot to tell the friend accompanying me. My poor, darling friend spent the first 10 minutes or so wondering how the hell she was going to break it to me that this person was awful! So firstly, a warning (not a trigger warning) that Dave is going to challenge you in the best way.


The atmosphere flips between uncomfortably tense and explosively uncontrolled guffaws. We go on a journey with Dave that starts with stand up then moves to, of all things, clowning, and then deeper and deeper into a meta-mental breakdown. There’s a lot of sensitivity and vulnerability to Dave, despite his misogynistic instincts and I found myself feeling so much empathy for him despite reminding myself of my twitter replies after catching the attention of Men’s Rights Activists. There are so many layers here, and with it comes nuance in the commentary on being a female comedian, being a male comedian, challenges to privilege, feminism and identity.

 

I completely understand how Zoë has won multiple awards for this show, which has already toured extensively. It’s clever, socially aware comedy cut with bad puns, dick jokes and physical comedy that catches you by surprise. People will love it or hate it. I’m firmly in the love camp.

15
Sep
17

Orpheus

 

Orpheus

Brisbane Festival & Datacom

The Tivoli

September 12 – 16 2017

 

Reviewed by Stephanie Fitz-Henry

 

 

What do you get when you cross a 1930s jazz music club in the middle of Paris with a tragic tale of Greek mythology? A delightfully whimsical and uniquely entertaining theatre experience that is sure to remain with you for a long time.

 

As I enter through the doors of The Tivoli for the Australian premiere of Little Bulb Theatre and Battersea Arts Centre’s production of Orpheus, it feels like walking through the clubs of 1930s Paris after midnight. The instantly recognisable French accordion melodies fill the space and set the tone for laissez-faire. French fashion adorns the floor. The staff and many of the guests have embraced the invitation to dress in feathered headbands, strings of pearls, pinstriped vests, braces and berets.

 

 

The allure of the Tivoli is intoxicating with the anticipation of a night of fun and frivolity, which intensified with the show starting almost half an hour behind schedule in true French style – not that anyone seems to notice. The main auditorium is set in true cabaret style where groups can enjoy table service. The rest of the audience is seated in rows around the periphery. The performers encourage the audience to move around the room and to enjoy the wine and French inspired food throughout the duration of the show.

 

 

From the moment this company steps onto the stage until the final curtain call, the show is peppered with a myriad of laugh-out-loud moments that carry us from one action to the next. The moments of hilarity will tickle the funny bone of even the most cynical of spectators.

 

The performers are so hilarious and tragic that you can’t help but laugh and cheer them on. It’s like watching a silent film of the same era. The music takes centre stage and steers the direction of the piece for the duration of the show. The intentional choreography of simplistic movement and gesture, and melodramatic facial expressions, is like watching Baz Luhrmann’s Strictly Ballroom and is just as hysterical. The cast are all highly trained musicians who play double bass (Clare Beresford), violin (Miriam Gould), accordion (Shamira Turner), Piano/Organ (Charlie Penn), clarinet (Alexander Scott), percussion (Tom Penn) and guitar (Dominic Conway), who are led by the very funny and Peron-esque qualities of Eugenie Pastor (flute/swanee whistle). They skilfully use their comedic talents, physicality and harmonious voices to entertain us. The acts, scenes and settings are projected onto the stage to guide our journey amid the amusing commotion. 

 

The marriage of Hades and Persephone receives loud applause when re-enacted by 2 male cast members.

 

There is beauty and power in simplicity and this is one reason this production is so good. Clever use of striking costumes, props, puppets and masks (Max Humphries & Cheryl Brown), stunning lighting (Michael Odam) and an emotive set design (Mary Drummond) enhances and envelops the show. The focus is on the detail; its specificity brings authenticity to every moment of this production and conveys the company’s professionalism. The cast doesn’t take themselves seriously and performs the roles with incredible generousity, earning 2 curtain calls and a standing ovation.

 

All the way from the UK for the Brisbane Festival, this fabulous production is totally exclusive to Brisbane audiences for two final performances on Saturday at 2pm & 7:30pm. Orpheus is not just a show – it is an all-encompassing experience. Turn off the television and forget about the footy. This is the most fun you can have in 3 hours at the theatre and the best value ticket in town at Brisbane’s most cherished venue.

 

 

The Company

Double Bass: Clare Beresford

Guitar: Dominic Conway 

Violin: Miriam Gould

Piano/Organ: Charlie Penn

Percussion: Tom Penn

Flute/Swanee Whistle: Eugenié  Pastor 

Clarinet: Alexander Scott

Accordion: Shamira Turner 

 

The Orpheus Team

Written and Devised by: The Company
Directed by: Alexander Scott
Designer (Set & Costume): Mary Drummond
Sound Designer: Ed Clarke
Lighting Designer: Michael Odam
Mask and Puppets: Max Humphries and Cheryl Brown
Scenic Artist: Rebecca Chan
Production Manager: Daniel Palmer
Sound No.1: Thomas Wasley
Company Stage Manager: Laura Hammond
Deputy Stage Manager: Laura Page
Tech Swing: Mitch Hargreaves
Tour Producer: Rosie Scudder
Little Bulb Producer: Fiona Baxter

In association with Farnham Maltings

 

The VAN DIJK 3

Jan Van Dijk: Violin
Miranda Deutsch: Guitar
Rick Caskey: Bass