Archive for the 'Interviews' Category

30
Aug
17

A Chat With Michael Beh, Director of The Curators’ Uncle Vanya

 

Eleonora Ginardi chatted with Michael Beh, Director of The Curators’ Uncle Vanya, before the season finishes in Bardon, Brisbane, on Saturday.

 

 

Why did you decide to direct Uncle Vanya?

I wanted to focus on the story of these characters and the facts of what they were going through.  Back in 1895 when Chekov wrote it – it’s exactly the same as today.  This was about love and lost love, and going for love and the feeling of being let down by love, and what is at stake all the time when you put yourself out there.

 

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What was your Artistic Vision?

I wanted to tighten up the play make it a little bit shorter to modernise it without taking it out of the world of Chekov and for that reason we brought it forward to the 20th Century.  It’s kind of got vintage costumes from the 30s, 40s and 50s, and so it is kind of located sometime in the 20th Century, or maybe it’s just lost in the midst of time.  It does not have to be what Russia was as it certainly is not styled in Russia – it’s not Russian then, but it has got a sense of being Russian.  It was wonderful that we were able to get a version of Crazy by – what is her name – Patsy Cline.  So we wanted a version of it to start the show. Peter met with a Russian lady in Brisbane and she translated the song into Russian and sent it to her daughter, who recorded it in New York and sent it back to us.

 

Well I loved it and Crazy is actually one of my favourite songs.  Why did you choose that song?

The whole point is that Vanya is crazy – crazy in love, crazy out of love, shot two times, missed did not even get arrested, could not even get locked up.

 

So, was he crazy from the start?

No he is a man going through the feelings that so many men go through.  I think maybe I go through and so many men feel let down by the choices in your life and I think that is something we can all reflect on. 

 

vanya1

 

Can you share some of the process that led you to making directorial choices?

Why did I make those choices,  I asked, what did I give up?  And because I gave that up this is how I ended.  We did this wonderful exercise for a whole weekend where we work-shopped the scenes of the play.  We went back and improvised we looked at the beginnings of all the stories and their characters relationships.  We did “improv’ after “improv” after “improv’ that never appeared on the stage but they fed the stage.  We did other things like a modern dance version one evening but all we did was a modern dance interpretation of the scenes and that really fed Sherry’s work.  So we tried lots of different strategies to unlock the texts to make it not just “talking heads”. I did not want “talking heads” I wanted physical bodies and the other thing I was interested in were montages that were slowly moving, and we have two or three of those in the play where moments/time seem to stop and the moment is extended out a little bit.  I wanted to make it beautiful so audiences could really experience and love the lushness of their relationship.”

 

I think that is a signature trait of the work you do – that lush and beauty, and aesthetic beauty in it.

What do they say – that beauty is difficult…

 

 

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26
Aug
17

Understudy Productions do [title of show]

 

A chat with the cast of Understudy Productions’ [title of show]

Hayward Street Studios August 31 – September 10 2017

 

We haven’t seen anyone tackle the hilarious cult hit [title of show] since Oscar in 2010 so it’s about time we saw it again. Ahead of Understudy Productions’ season, which opens next week, we chatted with the company’s founder and AD Alexander Woodward, and let the other cast members chime in…

 

We love [title of show]! Can you talk about the creative process, from the idea to bring a humble YouTube-Broadway surprise smash hit to Brisbane, to your independent company securing the rights to the show, to finding space and casting incredible talent, and preparing to put on a show? 

Alex: Directing is Ian Good, from the UK. We originally met when he came over while I was at the Con. He’s an outstanding director who’s fallen in love with the country and I trust him more than words can express. I’m a big believer that if i’ve put somebody in a position its for a reason, and after I’ve brought somebody in I just trust and believe in that persons judgement. This is the company’s third production and so far so good, so I’m going to stick with this attitude.

Rehearsals are amazing, better than could be expected. We’ve had such a quick process I thought it would be a scramble to the line but we are a week out and still have so much time to play so I’m beyond happy.

The process? Well I’m constantly on the search for theatre to put on. I heard about title while at uni and loved the concept; it’s such a theatre lovers’ show.

Putting on theatre is HARD. It’s expensive, and risky and really hard to get right, but I love doing it. Origin Theatrical are amazing and I love dealing with Kim there. She’s a theatre lover and is always so helpful getting us independents off and running.

 

Tell us about Understudy Productions.

So basically Understudy Productions was formed because I thought it was crazy that people thought they had to move cities in order to be involved in professional quality work. I also thought we have so much music theatre and acting talent coming out of Brisbane, let’s use it and create some shit hot theatre. There’s no reason Brisbane can’t have an independent theatre scene like what’s seen at the Hayes, or Chapel off Chapel.

 

Tell us about each cast member (or they can tell us about themselves!). What drew each of you to this show?

Alex: Jackson is a stupidly good actor. I remember being at uni and thinking, yeah, this guy is going places.

 

 

Jackson: Well it’s a bloody funny show, for a start. I didn’t actually know it before I started looking up stuff when I saw the audition brief for this production, but I remember listening to the soundtrack for the first time and laughing my tits off. It’s completely ridiculous, but has a real heart to it.

 

 

Lauren: My name is Lauren McKenna. I’m a Sydney based music theatre gal who has worked in Brisbane a lot in the past couple of years. I played the double of Martha/Ms. Fleming in the smash hit Heathers which played at QPAC and have been in Harvest Rain’s latest touring Arena productions of Hairspray (Tracy) and Grease (Jan). My nine favourite things are picnics, fresh flowers, tall humans, new stationary, sleep-ins, high belt, snail mail, edamame beans and salon manicures. I was drawn to this project because some friends told me I’d love [title of show]. They were right! Also, I have a massive crush on Brisbane so any excuse to work up here I jump at!

 

Joel: I’m Joel and I am the Musical Director and play Larry (the unfortunate forgotten pianist) in the show.

 

Will you tell us your real-life vampires?

Alex: Not being good enough, not getting work, letting people down from family to friends to ticket buyers. I always think its funny that performers are often highly strung/stressed/emotional types and here we get on stage and basically say, “Please like me, and please let me invoke some form of emotion on you”. Plus being poor…god, theatre makes you poor! Haha!

Joel: I’m terrified of not being good enough. That’s actually something that Jeff says in the number. One of these days someone is going to work out that I’m a fraud and I can’t do all the things that I’m employed to do/say I can do and then they’ll tell everyone and I’ll be fired, never work again, all my friends will hate me and I’ll end up penniless, lonely and miserable. Or something…

 

Will you share with us that show idea you’ve stashed in the bottom drawer?

Alex: Well, I’m pretty excited to putting on an Adults Only Christmas Show later this year at Brisbane Powerhouse. Every year of my adult life I’ve done “friends’ christmas” where we drink and dance, and be merry. I wanted to recreate that kind of idea for theatre. I think it sucks that the only option at Christmas is to go to church! I want to do the polar opposite of that.

 

Will you each share how you came to be a performer and what it is that keeps you in the industry?

Lauren: I’ve been doing musicals since I was 10 years old. There’s no other industry for me.

Jack: Storytelling is such a primal part of being human, and live theatre to me is one of the most rewarding ways of being part of that, either as a performer or audience member. Live theatre is different every time. I honestly can’t think of anything cooler than 5, 10, 200 or 1000 people going into a room together and having a storytelling experience that is completely unique to that group.

Alex: I used to play in bands and – long story short – went to visit my brother living in London, saw a show in the West End and went, “Wow, music theatre can be amazing,” and then knew I wanted to get involved. I came home and started doing courses and then I scored an amazing first gig with STC.

 

Joel: To be honest, I rarely perform anymore. I prefer my day job as a singing teacher, with the occasional MD gig.

 

Favourite / challenging / exciting roles thus far?

Alex: My first job ever was also the first thing I ever auditioned for. Spring Awakening with Sydney Theatre Company, it was like being thrown into a pool and it was sink or swim…. But I loved it. The most challenging role would have to have been Mickey in Blood Brothers, emotionally such a draining and in-depth role. You basically have to put yourself though a rollercoaster every show.

Lauren: Playing two characters in Heathers was incredible- an actors dream! Tracy Turnblad in Hairspray was so challenging stamina wise (especially in arena style) but ridiculously fun! Heidi in [title of show] is definitely up there with my favourites!

 

Roles you covet and would kill for?

Alex: Cliff in Cabaret, Evan Hansen in Dear Evan Hansen, Anything in Book of Mormon. Plus any role that has the power to invoke thought and change in people.

 

Other jobs? Your first job (perhaps it wasn’t in the performing arts industry)?

Alex: Professional Uber Driver and drink slinger.

 

What did mum and dad want you to do? What did teachers think you would do?

Alex: My parents are incredible and always encouraged me to do whatever I wanted. My mum has been working with the ABC for 30 years now, and my parents met while my mum did drama and Dad studied photography, so the arts was pretty much always engrained in them.

 

 

What else do you want to do?

Alex: I want to help create an independent theatre scene in Brisbane. I want there to be a Brisbane Hayes. There’s no reason why there shouldn’t be.

 

How does everyone keep fit and maintain healthy voices?

Alex: the show for me is a huge sing. Basically, 10 years of practice and semi-okay technique. (Still a long way to go!).

 

Why do we wanna’ see this show (again)?

Alex: Because it’s fun, it’s moving, and it speaks to everyone who’s ever been involved in performing. It’s just very music theatre.

 

Jack: [title of show] speaks to anyone with even the tiniest creative bone in their body. Rehearsing this has been an experience in uncovering relatable quality after relatable quality within all four of these beautiful, twisted, genius characters. Whether you are a musical theatre fan, a theatre fan, or you’ve never even stepped foot in a theatre, you will love it as much for its relatable charm as its ridiculous comedy.

 

Lauren: Because it’s awesome and I have to take my top off for the first time onstage… so you don’t wanna miss that!

 

What’s next?

Alex: After this I go full steam into producing A Very Adult Christmas…

 

 

19
Apr
17

Behind Closed Doors with EDC

WHAT: Behind Closed Doors

WHERE: QPAC Playhouse

WHEN: Friday 19 May to Saturday 27 May 2017

A sneak peak ahead of the season…

By Ruth Ridgway

Behind Closed Doors

Coming up in Expressions Dance Company’s 2017 season is the new work Behind Closed Doors. Choreographer Natalie Weir and the dancers explore what lies behind the façade of outward appearance, and turn the audience into voyeurs. Taking us into the private lives of hotel guests and staff, they reveal human nature in its darkness, fragility, and playfulness. Behind Closed Doors features live jazz played by the contemporary music ensemble Trichotomy.

An interview with Natalie Weir, Artistic Director of Expressions Dance Company

What inspired you to create Behind Closed Doors? Is it connected with your 2010 work While Others Sleep, which explores what happens at night in a hotel?

Yes, this is a re-visioning of While Others Sleep, taking some of the central ideas but we’ve moved into different areas this time. I’ve always been interested in voyeurism. I did a work called Insight years ago here at EDC, also with Greg Clarke, the designer. It used the Edward Hopper painting, ‘Night Windows’ as its inspiration and it was about looking through an apartment’s window. While Others Sleep in 2010 had so many ideas within it that I thought were great and I wanted to take to another level. I also wanted to work with Trichotomy again. Our audiences have grown and many have not seen the work, so why not set it in a hotel again and put it on a main stage? It has so many elements that are of interest to the audience and so many short stories within it. The audience have all stayed in a hotel and may relate to the story.

How did you and Trichotomy work together on Behind Closed Doors? Has music been especially composed for this work?

The music is part of Trichotomy’s quite extensive body of work over many years with a lot of pieces composed by Sean Foran. Sean is such an amazing person to work with – everything is easy. I felt like we really gelled when we worked together the first time. I’ve listened to a lot of his original music and this time I’ve spent a lot of time listening to his new stuff. There’s a lot of talking backwards and forwards with Sean. He alters his original music for me to match what I need, and then finds a way to blend the scenes together. Music is extremely stimulating and, because it’s jazz, it immediately sets the mood. When creating the show I imagined that Sean and the band are in the lobby playing in an expensive hotel. The music has a lot of range. It can be cool, sexy jazz but can also be very dramatic and dark. When we get into the rehearsal studio with the band they will watch the choreography and will be able to respond to the dancer in front of them – there might even be some improvisation. We’re lucky also to be joined by Rafael Karlen on Saxophone and vocalist Kristin Berardi. The great thing about these guests is that, not only are they amazing but, because they are a saxophonist and a singer, they can move around the stage and can become part of the action.

How did you and the dancers create the work? Did you create characters and a narrative for the characters, or did you follow particular themes or concepts?

Some of the characters have remained from While Others Sleep and some are quite new. I usually enter the studio with a strong idea of the characters and talk to the dancers about it – and then it’s collaboration between the dancers and me. They create a lot of the movement themselves and I direct it. They also research their characters, which is great because it takes them on a journey through the work. It’s my job to direct the dancers into the right place and to pull all the parts together. This is a big work with a lot of different parts including a set that moves and revolves, so I make sure this comes together seamlessly and keep the direction of the work moving forward. The dancers aren’t dancing what I tell them – it comes from them and then I shape it. I don’t tell them how to be a character they make that decision and own it, which makes it far more personal

The publicity for Behind Closed Doors has a ‘noir’ feel to it, but also mentions playfulness and fragility. How would you describe the balance of the moods and emotions in the work?

It is a balancing act because there are moments that are light and frivolous and others that are very dark. It’s finding a way to structure the work so that each of the moments has a time to be, but not detract from the other and that’s about finding the through line from the work from start to finish. Once you have all the parts you have to bring them together and the work has to be larger than the sum of the parts. While each part has its part as a small story and is part of the theme, it’s the strong narrative that brings it together. Some of the scenes go into the absurd and tongue-in-cheek and it wonders through the landscape of the human psyche. I think it will be very entertaining but it definitely has some depth and guts.

The publicity images of Elise May and Richard Causer in evening dress are very glamorous. Can you tell us more about the costumes and design of the work

The show is set in a very classy hotel and the costumes are designed to range from being quite real through to being quite fantastical. There are so many characters and scenes and the costumes are really important in bringing out the story and the images of the work and making us believe that the characters are real. Greg Clarke, the designer, has been influenced by the photography of Gregory Crewsden and films such as Blue Velvet and Mystery Train. There’s men’s suits, some glamorous dresses and even some underwear. And then some fantasy items that you need to see to understand! The design is really stunning. The costume design exposes the characters and helps inform the audience about who these people are and where they’re from.

The work can put the audience into the role of voyeur. How do you think they may feel about this? How has this potential audience response influenced the creation of the work?

At times the audience are like voyeurs watching something that perhaps they shouldn’t be, as if looking through a window or a door, but other times the characters really take the audience on their journey. That’s when the magic happens – the audience goes from being a voyeur to feeling like they believe in these characters and feel joy, sadness and darkness alongside them. It should be a wonderful theatrical experience for the audience because the gamut of the work is so broad from quite funny to very sad. It will be a roller-coaster ride. Isn’t that what theatre should do – transform the audience…?

Finally, what do you hope the audience takes away with them from Behind Closed Doors?

I know the audience will leave in absolute admiration at the beauty and physicality of the dancers and they will be in raptures over the incredible music played live. Having the musicians on stage playing live changes the theatrical experience. I hope the audience will recognise moments of their own lives, or someone they know within the work, and I hope they come away smiling and feeling moved. To connect to the audience is my ultimate aim. This work does not seek to alienate anyone, but to connect them. I always say that dance has the power to move people, even when you’re not sure why, and that’s its ultimate power.

Two quick questions for dancer Elise May:

What have you always wanted to know about what goes on ‘behind closed doors’ in a hotel?

As a dancer I’ve spent countless time checking in and out of hotel rooms on tour. There is a certain an allure to the homogenised hotel experience, no matter where you travel there are crisp white sheets, city views and monochrome corridors. But when you spend enough time in hotels you begin to notice the coming and going of other guests and wonder about the reasons for their stay or observe the odd hours that people keep. On occasions I have even started to project my imagination into the enclosed private spaces on the other side of the walls or behind the hotel doors… What is happening in the room beside mine? In a very identical room a very different scenario might be playing out, what could it possibly be? The inner private worlds of others has been a topic of interest in popular culture for some time. The concept of voyeurism has been featured in films such as ‘Rear Window’, ‘Minority Report’, American Beauty and countless others. For me, this fascination with the private lives of others is really an interesting starting point for a creative work and provides lots of meaty areas of exploration in terms of character development and movement creation. 

Can you briefly describe your role(s) in Behind Closed Doors, and how you have prepared for them?

My role in Behind Closed Doors is that of a lonely woman who is dealing with feelings of vulnerability and loss of her recently departed husband. We see her character first in the earlier stages of their relationship when they visited the hotel on their honeymoon. The romantic getaway was one of perfection in her memory and is an experience that comes back to haunt her as she returns to the hotel after his death. In an attempt to reconcile her feelings of grief and move on with her life she travels on quite an emotional journey throughout the work. In preparing for this role physically I have experimented with many different qualities of movement from abandoned, flung, weighty movements to angular, anguished and sharp dynamics. My role also involves a lot of incredibly intricate and sculptural partner work which is Natalie Weir’s choreographic forte. In researching the role I also looked into the 5 (or 7) stages of grieving as coined by psychologist Elizabeth Kubler-Ross which can manifest as a mixture/ or ‘jumble’ of strong emotions experienced by those who face major life changes including loss, the prospect of death or the death of a loved one. Although my role deals with some very heavy content, I think Natalie’s choreography weaves these scenes and characters together in a way which is poetic and really casts a microscope or possibly even a mirror over the human condition.

Natalie Weir's Behind Closed Doors. EDC. Image shows EDC's Richard Causer 2. Image by Jeff Camden COLOUR.low res. jpg

Two quick questions for dancer RIchard Causer:

What is your most memorable ‘behind the scenes’ experience at a hotel?

A few years ago I worked part time in a five star luxury hotel in London called Cafe Royal. There I was privy to many behind the scenes moments. One exciting memory I have was something I thought only happened in the movies. I worked as the restaurant host and events host. We would be given a guest list of names that we would expect to arrive for certain private functions or events. As these guests arrived I realised I was welcoming many A-list celebrities who checked in under fake names. It was extremely exciting as this happened on many occasions and I would have to contain my excitement which I never did too well. Instead I would lose all use of words and just smile from ear to ear. Not subtle at all!

What has been the creative process for you, as a dancer, working with Natalie Weir as the choreographer for Behind Closed Doors?

Working with Natalie is always such a heart-warming experience. The rehearsals are always calm and everyone is very respectful and supportive of each other. Working on Behind Closed Doors has been a fun satisfying challenge, we are all working with specific characters and get to play dress ups a lot. I have enjoyed researching my character by watching some great films and reading some interesting online forums which continue to feed me with new stimulus. What is great about working with Natalie is she allows us the freedom to continue developing our roles from the beginning of the process to the very last performance.

07
Apr
16

When One Door Closes – a quick chat with Circa

 

When One Door Closes opens at La Boite tonight!

Season continues until April 23

 

A door slams. A shot is fired. On the other side, unseen by the audience or by the befuddled, inconsequential husband and lovers are the three great heroines who created twentieth century drama: Miss Julie, Hedda Gabler and Nora.

What if they all landed up in the same room?

What if they couldn’t speak?

What if the room was full of scratched recordings of A Dolls House, Hedda Gabbler and Miss Julie, plus a dash of Freud?

How would they navigate each other, their own pasts and the future?

La Boite and Circa join forces on this new creation. Three masterpieces of turn-of-the-century drama meet the visceral force of extreme acrobatic theatre.

 

In between rehearsals we asked Nathan Boyle and Todd Kilby some STUFF…

 

WhenOneDoorClosesHR-348

 

Stretch or cardio?

NB: I’m about 75% stretch and 15% cardio. If i had to run away from something, I would be dead… Should probably change that.

TK: A healthy combination.

 

Base or fly?

NB: Base, although there are some times when I fly.

TK: Another deliciously healthy combination. (Middle)

 

Describe your weekly training routine.

NB: Every week is different, but it is generally along the lines of a 9 to 5 day except I don’t work at a desk. The first hour is a warm up. Then we move into skill training/skill development or we work with our Artistic Director. We have an hour break from 1 till 2 for lunch. Then generally have a light warm up and get back to work either working on specific skills or scenes from shows. At the end of the day we have a 30min cool down which we call ‘Body Love’

TK: My training routine will change a lot depending on where in the world I am, how long I have and what shows/skills I am doing. It usually begins with an hour long warm up consisting of some light cardio, stretches, strength and a bunch of co-ordination exercises/games (fun is very important). Then I usually train through the skills that I need to train for a specific show followed by any other skills and ideas that I am keen to learn and explore.

 

WhenOneDoorClosesHR-97

 

What if not circus? (And how did you come to it?)

NB: I have only ever done circus, So if I was no longer able to be a performer I would love to get into some sort of design. I love architecture but I also have a passion for costume/fashion design. So maybe that?

TK: If not in the circus, I would love to be involved in the worlds of both theatre and music. Working in the creative process and the performance element. I came to do circus when I was 13 through two sources at the same time. One was the guidance of a high school drama teacher and now friend, who ran a circus school and the other was at a Newcastle community circus called ‘Circus Avalon’

 

Favourite place in the world?

NB: Favourite place in the world would be New York.

TK: I don’t have one favourite place as that would be quite rude of me considering that this beautiful planet we are lucky to call home is host to a plenitude of magnificence, but here are three honourable mentions: NEWCASTLE (Home), BERLIN (City of my dreams), Bhutan (Carbon Negative)

 

WhenOneDoorClosesHR-174

 

What are you reading?

NB: The latest XS Entertainment piece *Wink Wink*

TK: Sombrero Fallout by Richard Brautigan

 

What are you listening to?

NB: I admit, I have the world’s most eclectic and somewhat bad taste in music, I will listen to anything. I basically have Spotify on random and go from there.

TK: Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia by Aram Khachaturian.

 

Define feminism.

NB: That one gender should not be raised above another, they are both equal.

TK: Feminism – The advocacy for woman’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes.

 

Are there commonalities within the roles you play across the stories of Hedda Gabler, Miss Julie and Nora Helmer (A Doll’s House)? 

NB: Yes and no, sometimes I’m a male and sometimes I’m female. It’s all very gender fluid.

TK: Commonalities are everywhere. I am man. I am woman. I am man/woman. I am woman/man. I am control, freedom and support. At one point I am even Hedda Gabler. This may sound confusing but through the dramaturgy of the show roles are free to exchange and create a whole.

 

WhenOneDoorClosesHR-159

 

Without dialogue, how much of the original stories & characters will we get? What’s the most important thing for us to get?

NB: There is some text, but instead of being spoon fed the plays we have used our physical bodies to encompass the roles of the women and men from the play. It’s quite obvious who the characters are as they are all so different from each other, come to the show with an active imagination and go with it from there.

TK: The characters, you will definitely get. That much is clear. As for the original stories, we have extended beyond them in time and space, whist exploring the thematics of the three plays.

 

What do we need to teach boys (and girls) about the roles of men (and women) in society?

NB: We need to teach everyone this. Each sex can be just as ignorant as the other. Your sex or sexuality shouldn’t define where you stand in society. If everyone is granted the same rights and same social status that question would be redundant. What a world that would be!!

TK: I’m not too sure about the ‘we’ and the ‘need’ in this question, but my view on our roles as human beings extend far beyond just boys and girls and men and women. Let’s just have care and compassion for each other regardless of gender, race, sexuality and religion. Let’s care for this planet. Let’s make people laugh. Xx

 

Directors Yaron Lifschitz & Libby McDonnell

Dramaturg Todd MacDonald

Lighting Designer Jason Organ

Costume Designer Libby McDonnell

Performers Circa Ensemble 

Composer Oonagh Sherrard

 

 

Production pics by Dylan Evans

 

11
Aug
15

Luminaries on the Loose launches this weekend!

 

luminaries_launch_header

The knowledge of the heart is in no book and not to be found in the mouth of any teacher, but grows out of you like the green seed from the dark earth.

 

Red Book, Carl Jung

 

Experience the sunlit world of Your super-conscious self – living Your best life exactly as You would have it.

 

This is my quest…super-consciousness and living my best life exactly as I would have it. This is why I struggle sometimes with being told what to do or how to do it. When Nadine asked me to share a part of the journey, I contributed a chapter written one morning with the light of the moon still lighting the room…

 

 

Actors are practised in making their dreams reality.

 

 

Luminaries on the Loose is a book of transformational steps and stories to guide you along three ancient and time tested phases and twenty-two steps that make up the Archetypal Trail so that you can live your best life.

 

 

Nadine Love has written nine of the compelling chapters and invited thirteen luminaries – all Australian – to pen their stories to demonstrate archetypal themes that spoke to each author.

 

 

luminariesontheloose_interview_cd
You may recognise some of the fabulous faces above:  Dr John Cronin, Edgar Winter, Susan Marie Hill, Kim Taylor, Peter Barr, Amelia McLarnon, Lana Mayes, Diane Steed, Rachel O’Connor, Xanthe Coward, Alice Haemmerle and Nadine’s own magical daughter, one of Poppy’s besties, Mira Love. They’re all contributors to Luminaries on the Loose. 
Listen to the author interviews here.

 

 

12 of the 14 Authors will be at the Launch Event – we hope you can be there too!

 

 

The Bohemian Bungalow, 69 Memorial Drive, Eumundi on 15 August 2015 9.30 am – 11:30am. Book online.

 

 

Launch-poster-small

 

*Live Music

 

 *Author Talks

 

 *Delicious Nibbles

 

 *A Glass of Bubbly

 

*Your signed copy of Luminaries on the Loose

 

 *Access to 3 Online Classes so you can “Track Your Archetype Trail” with Nadine Love

 

Stay after the launch to enjoy the up-beat feel-good funk/rock/reggae vibe of Byron Bay’s Wandering Eyes.

 

 

Wandering Eyes

 

 

 

03
Aug
15

A Few of My Favourite Men for one night only in Sydney

 

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So y’all might have noticed I don’t post too much publicity here ahead of events anymore. This is because

 

a) I am time poor

 

b) I am poor

 

We bloggers and writers take time to write stuff – the sort of time that you spend doing your job that pays you by the hour – and sometimes, like when there are bills to pay and artists to treat on Hastings Street, we need an incentive that is a little more inspiring than, “I’d love you to share this with your networks”. However, there are times when I’m happy to copy and paste stuff for a cause or a company I feel strongly about (otherwise you can enquire about my rates to promote your show or special event. I thank you). The Corrilee Foundation is a fave of mine.

 

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Our good friend, Tanya Lee, has always done incredible work with The Corrilee Foundation (you’ll remember One Night In Emerald City, which gave me another chance to work with the professional Sydney cast of a David Williamson play in our favourite destination to make and stage a show, Noosa), and this month she’s staging an extra special event, featuring a few of her favourite men on stage together for one night only, next week on August 12 at the basement, Sydney.

 

Wil-Anderson

So far the impressive line up includes Wil Anderson, Mikey Robins, Tim Rogers, Tony Squires, Dave Field, Geoff Morrell, Terry Serio, Jeff Duff, Peter Northcote, Dario Bortolin, Lloyd G & Greg Agar. 

 

The Evening will include Auction Items and Raffle Prizes.

 

Join Tanya Lee and a few of her favourite men for an evening of live music, banter and awesome images from Tony Mott

 

 

All funds raised will assist the Mirabel Foundation in its vital work to support children orphaned or abandoned due to parental illicit drug use.

 

The Mirabel Foundation was established in Victoria in 1998. It is the only organisation in Australia specifically addressing the needs of children who have been orphaned or abandoned due to parental drug use.

 

The tragedy of drug‐related deaths is compounded by the children left behind. Children without family may find themselves in foster care, sometimes separated from their siblings. Many go into the care of extended family (kinship care), usually with elderly grandparents who have little or no financial or social support. These are Mirabel children.

 

Mirabel is currently supporting over 1400 children and young people, the most profoundly overlooked casualties of substance abuse in our society.

 

“My Daddy is always sick and his medicine makes him sleepy.” Tahana, 3 years

 

Tahana is 3 years old and has recently moved to live with her great aunt Ruby. Her Mum is in prison for drug-related crime and her Dad is unable to care for her due to his addiction to drugs. Tahana knows a lot for a 3 year old and has remarkable survival skills. She can find a way to reach food in the highest of cupboards and can work the DVD player like a teenager.

 

Ruby was asked to care for Tahana when Child Protection found her wandering the streets looking for food. Ruby is committed to the long-term health and happiness of Tahana and says that she wants her to have a normal childhood. She has started attending Mirabel’s kinship carer support groups where she has met lots of people in a similar situation to herself.

 

Tahana and Ruby spent a cherished weekend together at Mirabel House where they strengthened their relationship away from the stresses of day to day living. They are looking forward to the next Family Day where Tahana can begin to make friends with children just like her – friendships that Ruby hopes will continue when Tahana is old enough to join Mirabel’s Recreation Program and Therapeutic Children’s Groups.

 

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You can support the amazing work the Mirabel Foundation do with kids like Tahana and have a terrific night out with friends when you join Tanya Lee and a few of her favourite men at the basement next week.

 

Book tickets here

 

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02
Jul
15

Country Song: a chat with singer/songwriter Megan Sarmardin

 

Queensland Theatre Co’s Country Song opens this weekend!

 

We asked Megan Sarmardin a heap of stuff because MT ISA CONNECTION.

It’s true. We knew Megan back in Bobcat Dancing days (Queensland Biennial Festival of Music 2003. She was sensational!)You may know Megan from her band, BullDust, or Little Birung or The Sapphires.

 

 

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Tell us about Country Song. A fictionalised celebration of the music and life of Jimmy Little.

I am very happy and grateful to be a part of this exciting production. Although a fictionalised story, it shines a light on many of Indigenous people that have contributed to music in Australia, particularly country music. The people mentioned in this play are some of these people who have influenced me too in terms of being a singer/artist.

 

This is your QTC debut! Congrats! How did you come to this show?

I have been working for a while now & the journey to QTC has been a long one. ‘Working’ is, by my definition, singing & gigging. Be it locally in Mount Isa or here in Brisbane (when needed). Acting has been a small part of it, but not as prominent as singing. That’s what I have been doing since I was about 7; singing & playing guitar. The skills developed from this, has obviously put me in good stead to be involved with professional productions, i.e. Queensland Music Festival and to work with talented musicians and artists. I developed my show Little Birung with John Rodgers & started performing that. My profile began to build in terms of stage work. I was then offered a role in The Sapphires & toured with that production, nationally & internationally. It was quiet for me for a couple of years, until earlier on this year when I was contacted by QTC about Country Song.

 

Tell us about growing up and finding music/performance opportunities. What can you advise aspiring singer/songwriters/actors do to get a foot in the door?

Singing and performing to me has never been about being famous. I have done it because I have enjoyed it, it made me happy and it made other people happy. I think it’s about making the most of everything you are given and being as actively involved as you can. I have been incredibly fortunate with the opportunities I have been given, whether it’s being in Mount Isa or being here in Brisbane. I have a band back at home called BullDust with three other talented Mount Isa musicians. Our motivation is just playing music and enjoying it. I will be performing for Australian Forces overseas later in the year.

 

There have been three things on my ‘to-do list’ for the last 12 years. One: to be in The Sapphires. Two: to play in the black arm band. Three: to work with Wesley Enoch. I have achieved all three.

 

I think the best advice that I can give to someone, whether they be a singer, songwriter, actress, actor, painter etc, anyone in the creative arts industry is to just do, try & pursue your passion. There have been times where I have had self-doubt and had thought about giving up, but at the end of the day, it’s you. You have to do it.

 

Tell us about your music.

Little Birung is the music I have made so far. There are a lot of different styles within Little Birung; blues, gospel, country, rock n roll. I have listened to and have been influenced by many different styles of music. I’d love to continue writing more material. The goal down the track is to work on an album of originals. That’s slowly getting momentum.

 

Little Birung is about my family history and the stories of the women in my family, particularly the relationship I have my Great-Grandmother, Flora Hooolihan. I sing songs about my Great-Grandmother, My grandmother, Margaret Gertz and my mother, Dixie Sarmardin. It focuses on Aboriginal Australia in North Queensland, going back to the turn of the century until present day, using my family stories set to song.

 

 

My Great-Grandmother, Flora will be 100 this year in October and has seen the show twice so far.

 

 

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Tell us about Women In Voice.

Women In Voice is the ultimate. I got to share the stage with Brisbane’s best female vocalists and I am very fortunate to call them friends. It’s a great gig being mentored by these fine and talented ladies, in the setting that is Women In Voice. This is a chance for female singers to do what they want. Sing what they want. To tell their stories how they want.

 

How important is music to you in terms of telling stories and making political statements?

Through the medium of music, you can convey a story, a message, a personal connection and emotions. It is a much more powerful medium. Music is universal. They don’t call it tugging on heart-strings for nothing.

 

What has it been like to work with Michael Tuahine, Reg Cribb and Wesley Enoch?

Michael has been a great mentor with this production. I met Reg briefly during the first week of rehearsals. It is a lot of fun to be surrounded by these creative people. They bring a wealth of experience and have been great mentors.

 

I have always wanted to work with Wesley. When I first came to Brisbane and heard about acting, singing, cabaret – all the things I was interested in, Wesley’s name was mentioned all the time. I had heard about the Sunshine Club, but had never realised the impact that Indigenous theatre and stories have had until later years.

 

I was out of school for a couple of years and went to visit my Mum at her work on my lunch break. I remember going into her office one day and seeing Deadly Vibe magazine article about the stage production, The Sapphires.

 

 

I said to myself, ‘I could do that. I’m going be in that one day’. I walked away and thought nothing more of it until 2011.

 

 

What will audiences get from Country Song? 

I think you will get a trip down memory lane, revisiting some of the country music classics. I think audiences will also get an insight into Aboriginal Australia during the 1960s and how it was a difficult journey to take, but through the support of his family, Jimmy did it.

 

What’s important about telling Jimmy’s story?

What’s important about Jimmy’s story is that he was famous in a time when Aboriginal people weren’t considered citizens in their own country. But that did not discourage him. He paved the way for many other Indigenous artists to follow; Bobby McLeod, Lionel Rose, Auriel Andrew.

 

What can you tell us about the Jimmy Little Foundation?

I believe that the Jimmy Little Foundation works with remote Indigenous communities to ensure healthy futures for Indigenous Australians. This is achieved through community engagement & a ‘whole-of-community approach’. Chronic illness in Aboriginal Australia is concerning & I believe that the Jimmy Little Foundation assists in improving the health and wellbeing of Indigenous families and children in remote areas.

 

To what/whom do you never tire of listening?

I was totally born in the wrong decade & have a fascination for country music as well as music from the 70s & 80s. Kiss, The Sweet, T-Rex, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Eagles, AC/DC (I have been to their concerts) – all of those of bands. I just love them. My Mum & Dad listened to a lot of that, so that’s what I grew up with. Dolly Parton is in the playlist as well. I used to work in a community Indigenous radio station back in the Isa, so country music is in my soul really.

 

What have you been watching?

Netflix is slowly taking over my life at the moment. I am pretty hooked on the TV show Californication. I don’t mind a bit of Hank Moody & his crazy life. The soundtrack to that show is great too.

 

Where do you go to escape?

I don’t physically go anywhere to escape at the moment I just get my guitar & play music. I find that family is a good place to escape as well. Grandma’s place in Townsville is great, especially when she cooks her famous rissoles.

 

Favourite meal to prepare at home?

Spaghetti Bolognaise. It’s good stuff. Especially when I make it. J

 

Favourite eats & drinks in Brisbane?

I recently discovered the Cobbler Bar in West End. Eats: there is too many to choose from. Anything is fine!

 

What’s next?

There is the mini-tour after the season in Brisbane, then a nice long extended holiday before the national tour in 2016. I have few gigs back at home, with a couple projects that I need to complete. Definitely looking forward to a bit of rest and relaxation time.